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Millikin University - Decatur, IL
The MPSL Sequential Program 
All Millikin students take a sequence of university studies courses designed to provide a challenging development through the first three years of study at Millikin. Three learning threads are introduced and developed through the sequential requirements: (1) ethical reasoning, (2) reflection, and (3) intensive writing. The sequential courses—IN140, IN150, IN151, IN250, IN251 and IN350—form a common learning experience for undergraduate students at Millikin. The first year courses emphasize ethical reasoning and academic inquiry along with related skills necessary for academic success, including critical writing, reading, research, and communication. In the second year all Millikin students take IN250 United States Cultural Studies and IN251 United States Structural Studies. Taught by faculty from across the disciplines, all students engage in ethical reasoning related to the study of the diversity of cultures, institutions, and social structures in the United States. In the third year, we challenge all Millikin students to examine global issues through IN350, which is taught by faculty from across the disciplines. The sequential university studies requirements deliberately challenge students to prepare for academic success, to understand our own country’s multicultural realities and to make connections to the international global society of the contemporary world.

IN140 - University Seminar
University Seminar is designed to bridge the gap between high school and college learning. One of the first courses that Millikin students take, IN140 Freshman Seminar, introduces freshman to academic inquiry. Students also make important connections with faculty members and other students, providing students with a stronger sense of community. Covering the breadth of the college experience, students examine orientation issues as well as strategies for academic success. They begin to question their assumptions and to practice communicating with diverse groups. The University Seminar classroom is intended to be a place of community, shared learning, and intellectual growth.

Learning Outcome Goals:
1. use ethical reasoning to analyze and reflect on issues that impact their personal lives as well as their local, national, and/or global communities.
2. reflect on the significance of contributions to community through service learning.
3. work collaboratively and creatively with diverse others.

IN150/IN151 - Critical Reading, Writing, and Research I & II
Critical Reading, Writing and Research I, a cohort to University Seminar, more fully explores student entry into academic inquiry. Students examine the connection between critical reading and writing and the opportunities such an exploration creates for academic success. Spring semester students continue to grow their intellectual inquiry in Critical Reading, Writing and Research II. The class emphasizes vital skills for academic and professional success. Students investigate and research a topic of their choice.

Learning Outcome Goals:
1. read critically to comprehend, analyze and evaluate texts;
2. write polished, informed essays for personal, public and/or specialized audiences;
3. conduct research to participate in academic inquiry; and
4. reflect formally on engagements with critical reading, writing, and research to acquire, examine, and present self-awareness about those engagements. 


IN250 - United States Cultural Studies
Sophomore year. United States Cultural Studies courses explore the diversity of cultures in the United States, including historical perspectives that inform contemporary understandings of diversity issues. “Culture” refers to learned systems of meanings, and their representations, that people use to interact with the world around them, including language, values, beliefs, norms, traditions, customs, history, art, and artifacts. Students will build on their introduction to ethical thinking by considering ethical and social justice issues and their responsibilities for democratic citizenship. These courses include a significant research component, are writing intensive, and require exploration of primary sources (e.g., texts, scholarly research, music, artifacts, etc).

Learning Outcome Goals:
1. analyze diverse cultures in the United States through the use of discipline-appropriate sources.
2. use ethical reasoning to make a judgment about some aspect of the culture of the United States.
3. reflect on your responsibilities as a democratic citizen in the United States.

IN251 - United States Structural Studies
Sophomore year. United States Structural Studies courses explore the diversity of groups and institutions in the United States, including historical perspectives that inform contemporary understandings of diversity issues. “Social structures” refers to generally stable patterns of interactions, from the smallest units found in individual social relationships, through larger economic, political and social institutions in societies, to worldwide systems of relationships among nations. Students will build on their introduction to ethical thinking by considering ethical and social justice issues and their responsibilities for democratic citizenship. These courses include a significant research component, are writing intensive, and require exploration of primary sources (e.g., texts, scholarly research, music, artifacts, etc).

Learning Outcome Goals:
1. analyze social structures within the United States through the use of discipline-appropriate sources.
2. use ethical reasoning to make a judgment about some aspect of the structure of the United States.
3. reflect on your responsibilities as a democratic citizen in the United States.

IN350 - Global Issues
Global Issues courses, taken during the junior year, explore a topic of global importance. Students will continue to develop their understanding of democratic citizenship with an intense focus on a particular issue of global importance and associated ethical and social justice issues. These courses include a significant research component, are writing intensive, and require exploration of primary sources (e.g., texts, music, artifacts, etc.).

Learning Outcome Goals:
1. analyze a topic of global importance through the use of discipline-appropriate sources.
2. use ethical reasoning to make a judgment about some aspect of a global issue.
3. reflect on your responsibilities as a democratic citizen in a global environment.
 
Millikin University - Decatur, IL
 
Millikin University - Decatur, IL
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