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Introduction to the Critical Writing, Reading & Research Program 
Millikin University > Academics > College of Arts and Sciences > Critical Writing, Reading, and Research > Introduction to the Critical Writing, Reading & Research Program

1.1 Millikin University-Wide Learning Outcome Goals

Millikin's mission is to offer an education that integrates the traditional liberal arts and the practical arts of the professions. Guided by faculty and staff, and within an inclusive and broadly accessible learning community, our students discover and pursue their full potential, personally and professionally, to do well and to do good.

Our mission is to deliver on the promise of education. At Millikin, we prepare students for:

•  Professional success;

•  Democratic citizenship in a global environment;

•  A personal life of meaning and value.

1.2 CWRR Student Learning Outcomes

The CWRR Program worked closely with full and part-time faculty who teach the course to develop the following learning outcome goals. They were approved by CWRR Faculty, Millikin's Council on Curriculum and the Millikin University Faculty in Fall 2005.

By the end of CWRR I and II, students will be able to:

•  read and critique texts actively, deliberately and carefully;

•  write polished, informed essays for personal, public and/or specialized audiences;

•  conduct research to participate in academic inquiry; and

•  reflect on the uses of reading and writing in their public and personal lives to better understand themselves, their communities and the world.

1.3 Connection to MPSL (Millikin Program of Student Learning)

IN 150 (CWRRI) & IN151 (CWRRII) are a part of Millikin's Program for Student Learning . The MPSL is a guiding document for student learning in the University Studies Program for general education requirements (See Millikin's MPSL homepage http://www.millikin.edu/mpsl/ for full descriptions and explanations of the program, including the sequential elements, of which CWRRI & II are a part). The two-course sequence meets the MPSL First-Year Writing Requirement. While CWRR courses are exclusively taught by English Department faculty, the program finds its home in the MPSL as a part of the interdepartmental sequential elements required of all students completing four-year degrees at Millikin University . That sequence consists of five courses: IN140, IN150, IN151, IN250 and IN350. Students are simultaneously enrolled in IN140 (University Seminar) and the first semester CWRR course, IN150. First-year students take IN151 in the Spring semester, IN250 in their sophomore year and IN350 their junior year.

By way of the MPSL interdepartmental sequential elements required of all students completing four-year degrees at Millikin University , the Critical Writing, Reading and Research faculty have both an initial and fundamental encounter with first-year students; this encounter is essential in enhancing students' critical reading, writing, researching and thinking skills and strategies, which will ensure students' academic success both in their majors and in the University Studies Program. To create learning environments conducive to these learning goals, full-time English faculty are committed to constantly developing creative, innovative and effective pedagogies or teaching the two-semester sequence.

1.4 Connection to University Mission

The CWRR Program's student learning outcome goals help accomplish the university-wide learning goals. Asking students to r ead and critique texts actively, deliberately and carefully, and to write polished, informed essays for personal, public and/or specialized audiences helps prepare them for professional success. Asking students to reflect on the uses of reading and writing in their public and personal lives to better understand themselves, their communities and the world prepares them for both a life of personal meaning and value and for democratic citizenship in a global environment. The additional emphasis on research in the second-semester course, specifically research conducted to participate in academic inquiry , further prepares students for professional success and democratic citizenship in a global environment.

1.5 Academic Bulletin Course Descriptions

Critical Writing, Reading & Research I is designed to develop students as critical writers, readers, and researchers. Emphasis is placed on writing and reading as the path to critical thinking. Students are asked read and critique texts actively, deliberately, and carefully, to write polished, informed essays for personal, public, and/or specialized audiences, and to reflect on the uses of reading and writing in their public and personal lives to better understand themselves, their communities, and the world. Library research component is introduced and integrated into the course. Section offerings vary in approach.

Critical Writing, Reading & Research II is designed to position students as successful writers, readers and researchers as they move into advanced coursework. In addition to continuing to develop reading and writing skills introduced in the first semester course, students will be asked to conduct research to participate in academic inquiry. Each student will write a research paper that demonstrates the ability to incorporate resources and contribute to academic discourse and communities. An extended and intensive library research component is integrated into the course. Section offerings vary in approach.

1.6 Common Assignments for Program Assessment

In order to assess the program, we ask that all students submit three common assignments as artifacts for assessment of student learning. While we ask that all CWRR faculty include these assignments in the teaching of the two-course sequence, all CWRR faculty members are free to develop creative and innovative pedagogies for assigning the artifacts. (See section 7 Assessment Methods and Processes for further explanation of the program's assessment processes). The following are general descriptions of each assignment that CWRR faculty may use to develop their own specific guidelines.

Reading Response (Collected in CWRRI)

This 300-word reading response asks students to engage in various reading skills such as summarizing, responding, critiquing and synthesizing. The text that students are asked to respond to could be any reading assignment for the whole class. However, the reading response should be a response to one text only.

 This reading response could take the form of an annotation, a short reading response paper or a reading journal entry. The credit points assigned to this reading response will be up to the individual instructors. To assist students in their reading response, CWRR faculty are encouraged to design guiding questions for the reading assignment. Such a reading response requires detailed instruction and guided practices on the reading strategies that are being assessed.

Research Essay (Collected in CWRRII)

This research essay asks students to bring together and practice the critical writing, research and thinking skills they have learned over the two-semester sequence. Individual CWRR faculty members have the liberty to decide 1) the topics suitable for the research essay; 2) the proper length (between 2,000 and 2,500 words) for the research essay; 3) time allowed for students to complete the research essay; 4) documentation style used for the research essay (MLA, APA, or Chicago Style). Please ask students to number the pages, double-space the document and include a title page.

Ideally, this project should be assigned and collected as the last major non-collaborative research project of IN151. To ensure the research essays reflect the best quality of IN151 students' writing, research and thinking skills, CWRR faculty are asked to give detailed guidance and instruction to students and allow them sufficient time and opportunity to revise the essay, with feedback from peers and/or the faculty member.

Reflection Piece (Collected in CWRRII)

Student reflection can be used to plan, examine and evaluate learning. Such reflective activities can include asking students to:

•  set goals

•  develop plans and strategies for their learning

•  assess the effectiveness of these plans

•  apply organizational strategies

•  reinforce what they have learned already (Nancy Joseph, 2003)

The reflection piece should not be a reflection or response to an assigned reading, but rather should be a reflection or response to the student's own encounters with the reading, writing and research processes during the semester. When CWRR faculty assign the reflection piece, it is important to:

•  talk to students about what it means to reflect

•  introduce students to the language of reflection

•  make students aware that they are reflecting on their own reading, writing and research processes and therefore engaging in meta- cognitive processes and practices.

For help with creating effective reflection piece assignments see sections 7.2 Artifact Descriptions and 7.3 Reflection Piece Assignment Suggestions . It is up to individual CWRR faculty to:

•  decide which of these suggestions to use for the reflection piece collection and how long the reflection will be.

•  choose how to use the reflection piece for their own classes

•  decide how much credit they want to give to their students for this assignment and how much time they wish to allow their students to write the reflection piece.

1.7 Common Grading Standards

Adequate work will earn a grade of “C.” “C” work tends to have the following characteristics: it fulfills the major requirements of a particular assignment; it maintains a clear focus throughout; it develops that focus with examples and supporting evidence; both the entire work and the paragraphs within are clearly organized, unified and coherent; it contains clear sentences with sound structure, word choice and few grammatical errors. “C” work is generally competent but predictable, lacking particular insight, imagination or originality. Similarly, the style is undistinguished; sentences tend to be simple, with little variety or complexity.

Writing that fulfills the requirements of “C” work, but is noticeably better in one or more areas may receive a grade of “B.” “B” work tends to have the following characteristics: it attempts to make a point of some originality or insight; it uses careful, logical reasoning throughout; it contains fresh, effective examples and supporting evidence; it uses language effectively; word choice is accurate and precise, and sentence structure and type are varied; it contains few, if any, grammatical errors; style is distinguished; tone is appropriate.

Outstanding work will earn a grade of “A.” It represents work of the highest quality in response to the assignment, bringing to the relationship explored not merely an acceptable level of knowledge, but true originality of thought and insight, as well. It is marked by excellence in all respects: conceptual, rhetorical and grammatical. It is not a reward for hard work.

Work that fails to fulfill one or more of the requirements of a “C” essay, but is marginally acceptable, will earn a grade of “D.” It generally has several serious flaws, which may include one or more of the following: it deviates from its stated or implied focus; it develops the topic inadequately, using illogical or insufficient examples and supporting evidence; the work as a whole and/or the individual paragraphs lack unity, organization, and coherence; it contains grammatical errors that cause interference with the understanding of the prose; it fails to illustrate an understanding of intended audience expectations.

Work that is unacceptable will receive a grade of “F.” “F” work generally exhibits one or more of the following characteristics: it fails to fulfill the assignment; it lacks a clear focus; it lacks support, often relying on simple assertions rather than legitimate examples and supporting evidence; it displays little organization, unity or coherence, either in the work as a whole or on the paragraph level; it displays little control of standard English, containing numerous and/or serious grammatical errors.

1.8 Special Courses

1.8.1 Enhanced

IN150E is an enhanced CWRRI course designed for freshmen who enter the university underprepared for college writing. The course focuses on writing, reading and research skills with additional emphasis on and practice with more fundamental skills and strategies that will help develop and improve at-risk students' writing and critical thinking, thus facilitating their transition into successful college writers and thinkers. Like the traditional IN150 courses, students are asked to write for a variety of audiences using various rhetorical strategies, incorporating discussions, readings and responses in such a way that will stimulate and enhance critical thinking, with emphasis on reflective, analytical and persuasive skills. This course functions in the same way as the traditional IN150 and prepares students for IN151 coursework in the second semester.

1.8.2 Honors

Students enrolled in Millikin's Honors Program rank in the top ten percent of their high school classes, meet standardized test score requirements and complete applications and interviews on campus. Although honors students are among the best their high schools have to offer, they often have writing instruction needs similar to students in regular CWRR sections. When teaching these sections, faculty should expect students to achieve the same goals as students in traditional CWRR courses (See section 1.2 CWRR Student Learning Outcomes). However, Honors CWRR faculty will also want to make clear to students how his or her particular Honors section differs from non-honors sections. The following information should be of use as faculty develop course descriptions and syllabi.

Millikin Honors Program Mission Statement, Goals and Hallmarks (as described in the online bulletin, which can be found at http://www.millikin.edu/bulletin/2005/honors.pdf ):

Mission Statement of the Honors Program

The Honors Program is an interdisciplinary community of scholars that provides students additional opportunities to reach their potential by challenging them intellectually and preparing them for lives of integrity, value and professional success. Based on the belief that excellence requires engagement, the program seeks creative avenues for integrating theory and practice, enhancing critical thinking, examining ethics and values and fostering the development of better citizens and successful leaders.

Goals of the Honors Program

The program will:

•  afford intellectually curious students a forum for an interdisciplinary and collaborative exchange of ideas through distinctive approaches to learning;

•  enable students to conduct substantial self-directed research, working closely with faculty mentors;

•  engage students in service to enrich the campus and larger community;

•  and prepare students to experience personal and professional success beyond Millikin.

 Hallmarks of the Millikin Honors Program

•  Small, engaging seminars with our honors students and faculty

•  Innovative courses with experimental pedagogy

•  Interaction with campus leaders among students, faculty, and administrators

•  Independent scholarship, under direction of faculty mentors

•  Diverse methods of inquiry, drawn from multiple disciplines

•  Creative pursuits that encourage risk taking

•  Service contributions during each year of the program

•  Flexibility in individualized plans of study

Freshman Focus

Freshman Focus day generally falls on a Saturday towards the end of April. CWRR faculty will want to make CWRRII honors students aware of this date as early as possible and include this requirement in their syllabus. During Freshman Focus, first-year honors students present their research papers (or papers in progress) to peers, faculty and each other in a conference open to the entire university community. Presentations should be 10 to 15 minutes long, and will be evaluated by peers and by honors faculty, who also moderate each session of four to five presenters. Students are encouraged to use power point or other visual aids, and they are required to attend at least one conference panel session other than the one at which they are presenting.

If students ask why they are required to attend and present at Freshman Focus, CWRR faculty might suggest the event is good preparation for other conferences they might attend while at Millikin, as well as a way to receive additional feedback on their writing projects. More information on the Honors Program, including useful handouts to give students, is available on the Millikin University web site.

1.8.3 PACE

PACE, or Professional Adult Comprehensive Education, offers an accredited degree completion program for adult students. PACE offers the following degrees:

•  Bachelor of Science in Organizational Leadership
(program available in Decatur and Mattoon , IL )

•  Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education

•  Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education

•  Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

•  Bachelor of Science in Nursing

PACE courses are conducted in an accelerated, five-week format. Students either begin their major with a cohort of other students or take pre-major, general education courses, depending on how many credit hours they bring with them. English faculty have taught IN150 and IN151 courses, literature courses, and business research courses (OL300); PACE courses undertaken by English faculty constitute a teaching overload. All PACE courses are expected to cover a full semester's worth of work in the five-week timeframe. Typically, the first assignment is prepared prior to the first night of class and is due at the first class meeting, and the final assignment may be due one week after the last night of class.  Students are expected to devote 10-20 hours per week outside of class time to coursework. 

English Department Office Policies & FAQ
2.1 English Department Office Policies

Office Hours —Office hours should be posted outside the faculty member's office door and listed on his/her syllabi. Faculty members are also expected to notify the Office Manager, Cindie Zelhart, of their office hours. Faculty members should also notify the Office Manager and/or their students if they need to cancel their office hours.
Holding Class —Faculty are expected to hold all classes during the semester, except for those days specified by the University (See section 11 Academic Calendar for 2006-2007). If the faculty member is unable to hold class, she or he should advise the English Department Office Manager. If possible, it is recommended that the faculty member find a substitute to teach the class.
Course Descriptions & Syllabi —The English Department Office Manager will communicate deadlines for submitting course descriptions and syllabi each semester. If the faculty member does not submit a course description in a timely manner, the annual academic bulletin description will be used. The annual academic bulletin course description should appear somewhere on all faculty syllabi, in addition to the course description specific the faculty member's course. (See 4.1 CWRR Syllabus Audit Form). Sample course descriptions and syllabi are available upon request.
Duplicating —Faculty members should submit materials prepared for Duplicating Services 48 hours in advance (excluding weekends, official holidays, and university holidays). Duplicating forms are available in the English Office, and it is important that faculty members return this form to the English Department Office Manager after duplicating is complete, even if the faculty member submits the job to Duplicating on his/her own. Copy machines are available in SH402 and SH434 for small jobs (less than 20 copies); however, because use of these machines is rather costly, faculty need to plan in advance and send large jobs (more than 20 copies) to Duplicating Services. Please work with the English Department Office Manager to meet all duplicating needs.
Course Packets —Course packets should be sent to Duplicating Services at least 2 weeks before the beginning of class. Class rosters should be given to the English Department Officer Manager so that duplicating fees can be charged to students' accounts. Be sure to include the duplicating form with the class roster. Students' accounts are charged 6-8 weeks after the semester begins. If faculty members plan to use a Course Packet for teaching, they should:

•  Send the course packets to Duplicating Services at least two weeks before the beginning of the class;

•  Give class rosters and the duplicating form to English Department Office Manager so that duplicating fees can be charged to students' accounts (usually 6-8 weeks after the semester begins);

•  Remember to include a statement about Course Packet fees on the syllabus.
Desk Copy Requests —Give the English Department Office Manager lists of desk copies needed and she will order them. Do so as far in advance as possible. The Office Manager will communicate deadlines for submitting desk copy requests.
Classroom Requests —Classroom Request Forms for upcoming semesters should be filled out and submitted to the English Department Office Manager one semester in advance. Generally, assignments are made the week before classes begin.
Faculty Office Assignments —Office assignments are made by the Dean of Arts & Sciences. Contact the Dean's office with office assignment requests.
Office Water Tower & Faculty Contributions —In the English Department office faculty members will find cool drinking water at their disposal. To help defray the cost to rent the tower and supply water, the English Department Office Manager takes monetary contributions from faculty who would like to use this service. Please see the Office Manager for details.  
2.2 English Department FAQ

As new faculty members become acclimated to Millikin's campus and network resources, they have many questions. The following list addresses questions concerning computer access and use, bookstore orders and special university dates. As other questions arise, please see CWRR Director, Carmella Braniger, Department Chair & Dean of Teaching and Learning, Randy Brooks and/or English Department Office Manager, Cindie Zelhart.

Computer Access —All CWRR faculty members are provided with computer access. Computers are connected to department printers. See the English Department Office Manager with questions as to where documents are to be printed.
MU Online —During New Faculty Orientation, the university's IT department will introduce faculty members to MU Online software use. This software will allow faculty to view class rosters, view teaching schedules, view final exam schedules, post mid-term and final grades, utilize the Academic Alert System, access information for advising students and view faculty evaluations.
Groupwise —All faculty are provided with a university subscribed e-mail account. Faculty are expected to effectively communicate with students through e-mail. The account should be set up at the faculty IT orientation. Contact IT at extension X6488 with questions.
Bookstore Orders —Bookstore orders are placed in the last 6-8 weeks of the semester preceding the semester the books are needed. The Bookstore contact, Jeanne Martin, will communicate deadlines for submitting books orders in a timely fashion. Book order forms are available either from the bookstore, or the English Department Office Manager. Orders can also be e-mailed to mubookstore@mail.millikin.edu . Contact the Office Manager with questions.
Advising Day —Classes will not be held on Advising Days. Faculty will be meeting with advisees on these days to discuss academic plan of study and to register next semester's classes. New faculty are not expected to advise students until their second year of teaching. Advising Day for Fall 2006 is November 7. Advising Day for Spring 2007 will be April 3.
Add/Drop and Withdraw Dates —Please be aware of drop/add and withdraw dates. These dates can be found at www.millikin.edu/academics/calendar.asp and are included in the last section of this handbook (See section 11 Academic Schedule for 2006-2007).
Faculty Opportunities, Responsibilities & Expectations 
3.1 Faculty Opportunities

The CWRR Program supports the following statement, taken from Millikin University 's most recent Faculty Policies & Procedures Manual (1.2.1 Academic Freedom at Millikin University ):

Millikin University requires that academic freedom be exercised in harmony with the specific character and objectives of the University, which are those of an institution of higher learning. In consequence, it expects the members of the faculty to be supportive of the Mission and Vision Statement of the University.

Institutions of higher education are conducted for the common good. The common good depends upon the free search for truth and its free exposition. Academic freedom is essential to these purposes and applies to both teaching and scholarly/artistic activities. Academic freedom in scholarly/artistic activities is fundamental to the advancement of truth. Academic freedom in its teaching aspect is fundamental to protecting the rights of the faculty member in teaching and the student in learning. The faculty member is entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing the faculty member's subject, but should exercise reasonable care not to introduce into the teaching controversial material, which has no relation to the subject.

Additional Opportunities for CWRR Faculty

•  Technology Opportunities —CWRR faculty are increasingly teaching courses in classrooms equipped with a variety of technology. (See 10 Best Teaching Practices in the CWRR Electronic Classroom for a full explanation of how to access and use such technology). When submitting room requests, faculty should consider their technology needs and request rooms appropriate for those needs.

•  Librarian Partnership — The CWRR Program is in partnership with the Staley Library and its faculty. Librarians with terminal degrees in their respective field aid CWRR faculty in library and research instruction. CWRR faculty are encouraged to take advantage of the opportunity to coordinate this instruction by actively engaging the librarian partner, and by communicating and planning for those days when the librarians will come into their CWRR classroom to instruct. CWRR faculty should be present at all class sessions led by the librarian. (For more information on this partnership, see section 6 Library Instruction).

•  IN140 University Seminar Cohort Partnership — In addition to the partnership with the Staley Library, the CWRR Program is also intimately connected with other MPSL interdepartmental sequential courses required of all students completing four-year degrees at Millikin University . Specifically, in the Fall semester of each academic year, individual students in each section CWRRI are also enrolled in the same section of IN140 University Seminar. Students find the cohort beneficial as they make the transition from high school to college academics. CWRR faculty are encouraged to take advantage of this unique cohort relationship by communicating with their assigned or chosen cohort about course materials, plans and student progress. They are also encouraged to work together on planning shared readings, writing assignments, classroom activities or other curricular events. (See section 5.2 IN140 University Seminar for a full description of the cohort and expectations for individual faculty partnerships).

•  Faculty Mentoring and Observation — All new full and part time CWRR faculty members have the opportunity for mentoring as they become accustomed to Millikin's unique first-year writing program and its requirements. New faculty members will be observed at least once by the CWRR Director during their first year of teaching. The Director and faculty member will plan in advance for the observation by discussing the current state of the course and agreeing on the best day for observation. Following the observation, the Director will meet with the faculty member to discuss the class period. The Director will then write a letter of observation to be shared with the faculty member, Department Chair and Dean. New faculty members should always feel free to approach the Director or any seasoned CWRR faculty member for advice and help with classroom issues and/or course planning.

•  Writing Center — The Writing Center is directed by Judi Crowe. The Center is staffed by English Department faculty and English majors. The Center not only works with students one-on-one throughout the school year, but also offers workshops for CWRR students in order to help improve their writing. CWRR faculty are encouraged to promote student use of the Writing Center as a facility for receiving support for their writing.

3.2 Faculty Expectations & Responsibilities

The CWRR Program supports the following statement, taken from Millikin University's most recent Faculty P & P Manual (1.2.3.1 Teaching):

It is the responsibility of the faculty member to provide an arena in which students can develop competency in skills, knowledge, and values. The faculty member should also aspire to instill in students a passion for learning, challenging each student at his/her own level, as relevant problems and issues are addressed.

Teaching effectiveness varies according to the interaction of subject matter, teaching methods, and students' learning styles. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the faculty member to seek to identify and pursue those teaching methods best suited to each situation, whether it be collaborative teaching, apprentice/mentor roles, service learning opportunities, seminar/discussions, or traditional lecture models. In all learning situations, the faculty member should place a high value on active learning in which each student is encouraged to integrate knowledge between courses, and connect learning to practices and problems in society.

The following lists additional responsibilities and expectations for CWRR Faculty.

•  CWRR Monthly Meetings and Workshops —Faculty members should plan to attend the monthly CWRR meetings and all CWRR workshops. Dates and times for these meetings and workshops will be posted on the CWRR website at the beginning of each semester. These meetings and workshops provide faculty development opportunities and allow faculty to be involved in programmatic decision-making processes. The monthly meetings also provide a forum for discussing teaching methods and pedagogies for first-year reading and writing courses.

•  Office Hours & Student Contact —According to the current Faculty Policies & Procedures Manual “Students count individual conferences with faculty members as one of the greatest assets of an institution like Millikin.” Faculty should be prepared to hold at least five (5) office hours per week in order to meet with individual students to discuss their needs and concerns. These hours should be posted outside the office door and listed on the syllabi.

Because all faculty members are provided with a university subscribed e-mail account, they are expected to effectively communicate with students through e-mail.

•  Holding Class —All CWRR faculty members are expected to hold classes according to the university's academic schedule. This communicates to students the importance of their own regular tending to the tasks of the course. If the faculty member is unable to hold class or office hours, he or she should notify the English Department Office Manager.

•  Syllabus —Faculty members should consult the CWRR Syllabus Audit form (See 4.1 Syllabus Audit Form) when creating syllabi for both courses. Faculty should provide students with a syllabus within the first week of class. In addition, faculty should send electronic copies of syllabi to the English Department Office Manager for university filing. The Office Manager will communicate deadlines for submitting syllabi each semester.

•  Course Descriptions —Faculty members should submit a brief course description for each CWRR course they plan to teach the semester before the course is offered. The English Department Office Manager will communicate deadlines for these descriptions each semester. If the faculty member does not submit a course description in a timely manner, the bulletin description will be used. Sample descriptions are available upon request.

•  Plagiarism — Faculty should include a statement on all syllabi about plagiarism. If a faculty member suspects an instance of plagiarism, the faculty member should seek advice and support from the CWRR Program Director, and then from the Dean of Teaching and Learning. (See 4.2 Required Statements to view the CWRR Program's standard Academic Honesty Policy. See 10.5 Preventing Plagiarism for advice on how to help students avoid plagiarism).

•  Students with Disabilities — Faculty should include a statement on all syllabi about student disability accommodations. ( See 4.2 Required Statements to view the CWRR Program's standard Disability Accommodations Policy ) .

•  Course Packets & Turnitin — Faculty using course packets or Turnitin software should include detailed statements concerning student use, rights and responsibilities.

•  Attendance, Missed and Late Work Policies —The Millikin Bulletin describes attendance in the following manner: “As responsible persons, Millikin students are expected to attend all regularly scheduled classes and laboratories. However, students are responsible for material covered in class, whether or not they are present.” Taking into account the university's expectation for class attendance, CWRR faculty should set their own attendance policy to meet their pedagogical needs.

At the beginning of each semester, faculty should inform students about their policies on attendance, missed work and late work. This written policy should appear in the course syllabus distributed during the first week of class. It is the student's responsibility to understand and abide by these policies. Faculty should take note of excessive absences and are encouraged to report them to the Office of Student Life and Academic Development and the Office of the Registrar through the Academic Alert system.

Individual faculty may have different policies about attendance and makeup privileges for students absent on University business, and students should determine this in advance of their anticipated absences. PACE students follow the attendance policy of the PACE Program.

•  Grade Sheets & Attendance Records —Faculty should keep clear, legible grade records and dated attendance sheets throughout the semester. If the faculty member leaves Millikin for any length of time, she or he should leave his or her most recent records with the English Department Office Manager.

•  Academic Alert System —MU Online is equipped with a system for notifying Student Learning and Academic Development if students are not attending class or are performing nominally in the course. Faculty are encouraged to post academic alerts frequently for students at risk for academic success in CWRR courses. (For more information on the Academic Alert System, see section 9.2 Resources and Support). Please contact IT or the Director of CWRR with questions or concerns.

•  Class Size —All CWRR courses are capped at twenty students. Faculty are not expected, under any circumstances, to exceed this cap by signing in additional students, and, in fact, are encouraged to keep the cap at twenty. A small class size is one of the strengths of the CWRR Program.

CWRR Syllabus Policies
4.1 CWRR Syllabus Audit Form

 

 
 Syllabus is acceptable on item
 Syllabus has item included but not in acceptable form
 Syllabus does not have item
 
REQUIRED TOP of FIRST PAGE:

Course Identification: course name, course number and section(s), CRN #, faculty, semester, year
  
  
  
 
SOMEWHERE in SYLLABUS:
  
  
  
 
Faculty Contact Info: name, office, office hours (must hold at least 5 per semester), office phone, email address
  
  
  
 
General Bulletin Course Description (See 1.5 General Course Descriptions--Academic Bulletin)

 
  
  
  
 
Faculty written course section description/overview.
  
  
  
 
CWRR Student Outcome Learning Goals (See 1.2 CWRR Student Learning Outcomes)
  
  
  
 
Program Grading Policy - scale and weights for assignments & for the semester. The handbook also includes a suggested set of grading standards that many CWRR faculty use. (See 4.3 for commonly used CWRR Grading Policies)
  
  
  
 
Policy Statement on Library Instruction Requirement (See 6.4 Sample Syllabus Policy Statement)
  
  
  
 
Instructor's Attendance Policy and Penalties (See 4.3 for suggested statement)
  
  
  
 
Disability Accommodation Policy (See 4.2 Required Syllabus Statements)
  
  
  
 
CWRR Academic Honesty Statement
(See 4.2 Required Syllabus Statements)
  
  
  
 
CWRR Artifact Collection Description
  
  
  
 
OPTIONAL ITEMS:
  
  
  
 
Course Schedule (including Add/Drop/Withdraw dates, advising day and holidays)
  
  
  
 
Course Conduct (food, cell phones, late policy)
  
  
  
 
Final Exam Policy
  
  
  
 
IN140 Cohort Statement (IN150 only)
  
  
  
 
Late work, missed in-class work and make up policy
  
  
  
 
Presentation & Writing Evaluation Rubrics
  
  
  
 
Learning tools instruction and guidelines
  
  
  
 
Policy on textbook requirements & others fees
  
  
  
 
Resources Policy (guide to technology, library, writing center, etc.)
  
  
  
 
Full Statement on Turnitin (if software will be integrated into the class)
  
  
  
 
Writing Center help and guidelines
(See 4.3 for suggested statement)
  
  
  
 

 4.2 CWRR Required Syllabus Statements (May Not Be Modified)

All CWRR faculty members must include the following statements in their syllabi for all CWRR sections, including Honors and Enhanced courses.

CWRR Student Learning Outcomes (include these in all CWRR syllabi)

By the end of CWRR I and II, students will be able to:

•  read and critique texts actively, deliberately and carefully;

•  write polished, informed essays for personal, public and/or specialized audiences;

•  conduct research to participate in academic inquiry; and

•  reflect on the uses of reading and writing in their public and personal lives to better understand themselves, their communities and the world.

General Bulletin Course Descriptions (include these descriptions in all CWRR syllabi)

Critical Writing, Reading & Research I is designed to develop students as critical writers, readers, and researchers. Emphasis is placed on writing and reading as the path to critical thinking. Students are asked read and critique texts actively, deliberately, and carefully, to write polished, informed essays for personal, public, and/or specialized audiences, and to reflect on the uses of reading and writing in their public and personal lives to better understand themselves, their communities, and the world. Library research component is introduced and integrated into the course. Section offerings vary in approach.

Critical Writing, Reading & Research II is designed to position students as successful writers, readers and researchers as they move into advanced coursework. In addition to continuing to develop reading and writing skills introduced in the first semester course, students will be asked to conduct research to participate in academic inquiry. Each student will write a research paper that demonstrates the ability to incorporate resources and contribute to academic discourse and communities. An extended and intensive library research component is integrated into the course. Section offerings vary in approach.

Disability Accommodation Policy (include these paragraphs in all CWRR syllabi)

Please address any special needs or special accommodations with me at the beginning of the semester or as soon as you become aware of your needs. If you are seeking classroom accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, you should submit your documentation to the Office of Academic Development at Millikin University , currently located in Shilling room 205.

Academic Honesty Policy (include these paragraphs in all CWRR syllabi)

All students are expected to uphold professional standards for academic honesty and integrity in their research, writing, and related performances. Academic honesty is the standard we expect from all students. Read the Student Handbook for further details about offenses involving academic integrity at: http://www.millikin.edu/handbook/judicial_system.asp .

Staley Library also hosts a web site on Preventing Plagiarism, which includes the complete university policy. It is located at: http://www.millikin.edu/staley/research/prevent_plagiarism.asp .

Visit and carefully read the Preventing Plagiarism web site.

The Faculty has the right and the responsibility to hold students to high ethical standards in conduct and in works performed, as befits a scholar at the university. Faculty members have the responsibility to investigate all suspected breaches of academic integrity that arise in their courses. They will make the determination as to whether the student violated the Academic Integrity Policy. Should the faculty member determine that the violation was intentional and egregious, he or she will decide the consequences, taking into account the severity and circumstances surrounding the violation, and will inform the student in writing, forwarding a copy of the letter to the Registrar and to the Dean of Student Development.

This letter will be destroyed when the student graduates from the University unless a second breach of integrity occurs, or unless the first instance is of sufficient magnitude to result in failure of the course, with an attendant XF grade recorded in the transcript. If an XF is assigned for the course, the faculty letter of explanation becomes a permanent part of the student’s record. If a second violation occurs subsequent to the first breach of integrity, the Dean of Student Development will begin disciplinary and judicial processes of the University, as outlined in the Student Handbook.

If a student receives an XF for a course due to academic dishonesty, this remains as a permanent grade and cannot be removed from the transcript. However, students may repeat the course for credit toward graduation. Some programs and majors have more explicit ethical standards, which supersede this Policy, and violation of which may result in dismissal from some programs or majors within the University. If you have difficulty with any assignment in this course, please see me rather than consider academic dishonesty.

4.3 CWRR Suggested Syllabus Statements (May Be Modified)

The following are examples of statements faculty are encouraged to include in the CWRR syllabus. The program highly recommends that faculty clearly communicate required elements of the course, such as assessment artifact collections, library instruction, IN140 University Seminar cohort relationships and the use of course packets. Faculty should also explicitly communicate course and classroom policies (attendance, late work, classroom behavior). Faculty may also want to address the students' uses of resources such as the Turnitin, Livetext and the Writing Center . The following are samples of such statements that may be modified by individual faculty members to suit their pedagogical needs.

CWRR Artifact Collection
The CWRR Program collects writing from each CWRR section to help with assessing the program. Submitting this writing artifact is a requirement for this course. You will not receive a grade for the course if you do not submit all requested CWRR artifacts.

Library Instruction
The CWRR Program has a collaborative partnership with Millikin's research librarians, professionals whose expertise is in finding and evaluating information. As part of this course, then, you will receive instruction on information literacy. As part of that instruction, you will need to complete a variety of assignments. As with the collection of CWRR artifact(s), you will not receive a grade for the course if you have not completed these information literacy assignments.

University Seminar Cohort

The CWRR Program is in partnership with the University Seminar (IN140). Both courses are a part of the MPSL interdepartmental sequential elements required of all students completing four-year degrees at Millikin University . This Fall semester, your classmates in our section CWRRI are also enrolled in the same section of the IN140 University Seminar. We call this the IN140/150 cohort. The cohort will help you to make the transition from high school to college academics. Your IN140 professor and I will be communicating with one another about the course assignments, syllabi, readings, classroom activities, curricular events and other class matters. We will work together to make your first-year experience here at Millikin the best it can be. If you have any questions about the cohort feel free to approach myself or your IN140 instructor for help.

Course Packets & Additional Materials

In addition to the books you buy for this course, supplementary reading material will be delivered to you in a course packet and/or may be distributed throughout the semester. After the sixth week of class, your university account will be billed for the cost of these necessary materials.

Late Work

Late work is work handed to me (not left in my box or on my desk) after the class period in which it is due. The grade for late work will be reduced by 5% for each day late, including weekends. You have one week (7 days) after the due date to turn in late work. Assignments will not be accepted after this 7-day grace period. This policy includes drafts, as well as final copies.

Attendance Policy

With the exception of rare and extreme circumstances, I do not distinguish among kinds of absences for attendance purposes. Contact or see me immediately if rare and extreme circumstances arise which will affect your class attendance.

You are expected to be present every day your class meets, but to accommodate accidents, illnesses, and emergencies, I allow a number of absences without penalty. Absences beyond the limit are considered excessive and result in grade reductions. Reductions will be taken on a percentage basis from the total number of points possible in the course. Students are expected to arrive in class on time in order to be counted present.

For MWF classes, the following policy will apply: you may miss 3 times without an automatic grade reduction; 4 absences = a final grade reduction of 5%; 5 absences = a final grade reduction of 10%; 6 absences = a final grade reduction of 15%; 7 absences = a final grade reduction of 20%; 8 absences = a final grade reduction of 25%; and 9 or more absences = failure of the course.

For TTH classes, the following policy will apply: you may miss 2 times without an automatic grade reduction; 3 absences = a final grade reduction of 7.5%; 4 absences = a final grade reduction of 15%; 5 absences = final grade reduction of 22.5%; 6 or more absences = failure of the course.

Expectations for Classroom Behavior: Faculty members have the responsibility and the authority to maintain a productive educational environment in the classroom.  It is the responsibility of the student to practice conduct conducive to learning by being prepared, prompt, attentive, and courteous in the classroom and by accepting policies set forth by the professor to maintain an academic decorum.

Acceptable classroom behavior is behavior that encourages critical inquiry and thought and promotes a shared community of learners. Focused attention on the tasks at hand and respect for fellow peers are expected. During classroom discussions and presentations, you need to listen carefully to others and be prepared to add relevant insight and responses.

Behavior that repeatedly interferes with my ability to teach class or the ability of other students to benefit from the instructional program include: constant idle chit-chat, idleness, irrelevant use of computers, routine late arrival or early departure, inappropriate interruptions (such as back-pack shuffling or cell phone use), use of threatening language and personal insults toward the professor or other students. This behavior is inappropriate and will be subject to appropriate disciplinary measures.

Turnitin

This course uses an electronic tool to ensure that you are using sources effectively and ethically. The service, Turnitin, checks your essays against its own database of submitted essays, the Web, and an electronic database of articles and books. It does not release essays without the consent of the instructor. More information about Turnitin is available at http://www.turnitin.com. If you have questions about citing sources, see the Staley Library's site and/or the Writing Center 's website on documenting sources.

LiveText

As a student here at Millikin, you have the opportunity to use Livetext in a variety of ways that will benefit you, not only during your years at Millikin, but also as you look for career opportunities or explore graduate schools. Livetext offers a virtually unlimited amount of memory so that you can store and revisit materials during your entire scholastic career. Once you have signed into the program, it is available to you for the next five years. While Livetext can be used for peer reviewing and instructor review and evaluation, you manage who may visit and view specific work, thus maintaining control over you own work and keeping your portfolio confidential.

As a result of the large storage capacity, you can download public presentations, musical performance, auditions and so forth which may later be shared with prospective graduate schools or employers. Livetext, therefore, serves not only as a learning tool but also as a repository that allows you to collect your work, to evaluate it for particular audiences, and to reflect on what has been learned from that work.

Writing Center

You can receive valuable help with your writing by visiting Millikin's Writing Center . The Writing Center is a free, one-on-one service that helps you develop global strategies for improving writing, reading, and critical thinking processes in a friendly, relaxed, and supportive environment. The Writing Center helps with all aspects of writing, from brainstorming for ideas to overcoming writer's block, to the final editing and proofreading strategies, as well as advice for drafting, expanding and organizing your writing. The Center also offers help with proper documentation style and plagiarism concerns. While you [ may/are required] to visit the Writing Center for this course, do not limit yourself to those visits; the Writing Center is used by all students in need of help with writing assignments from any course. Remember to bring with you your assignment sheet and/or your draft for each of your writing projects. The Center is located on the second floor of the Library in Room 203. Although walk-ins are accepted, scheduled appointments have priority and are recommended. Call or email for an appointment at 424-6353 or wcenter@mail.millikin.edu.

University Connections External to CWRR Program
5.1      Writing Center
The Writing Center serves all levels of writers, from beginners to advanced writers, and attempts to overcome the stereotype that the Center is a place where only “remedial” students come for help. The Center views writing as an ongoing process, and helps students at every point of that process, from understanding readings and interpreting assignments to brainstorming, organizing, drafting and editing.

The Writing Center is open from 1-10 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 6-10 p.m. on Sunday.  While walk-ins are welcome, scheduled appointments take priority. Students are encouraged to make appointments by calling the Writing Center at 424-6353 or emailing wcenter@mail.millikin.edu. All student visits are documented, and students may request that faculty members receive a copy of their Contact Form. We will send the form via email, which is set up such that faculty can easily route it to a folder for their convenience.  (See section 9.2 Resources & Support for additional information.)

5.2      IN140 University Seminar
Because CWRRI & II are interdepartmental courses, and are components of the sequential elements that compose a part of the University Studies requirements, the mission and goals of our courses and other required courses are closely connected.  In particular, we have a strong connection with the University Seminar (IN140) by way of a cohort with CWRRI (IN150) during the Fall semester.  Faculty who teach sections of the two courses are paired and share the same group of incoming Fall first-year students.  Faculty often work together to create coherence and a sense of community as first-year students join Millikin’s academic community.  The cohort provides structure for first-year students to adjust to the rigors of university life.  CWRR and Seminar faculty aid students in their transition to university studies.  Because of the important nature of this cohort and its effects on the retention of students here at Millikin, we encourage faculty to work as closely as possible with their IN140 cohort.

Cohort Relationship Expectations

Basic—We ask that each faculty member engage in consistent and frequent communication with his or her IN140 cohort faculty member.  This communication can involve sharing syllabi, goals, assignments, important dates and/or important classroom and extra-curricular events.  Faculty should also keep in contact about students with special needs, students having difficulty adjusting to academic life or students struggling with attendance or grades.  Providing support for students through such communication can make a big difference in first year student success rates.  In addition to visiting one another’s classes, CWRR faculty are often invited and encouraged to attend a First Week event organized by the IN140 cohort faculty. 

Communication with the students about the nature of the cohort is important, as well.  Faculty should let students know that they will be speaking with their IN140 faculty member about the general nature of the course; both IN140 and IN150 faculty members should inform their students of ways in which the courses are connected.  These basic forms of communication allow students to understand the nature of cohorting.  Such communication also increases students’ knowledge of the ways in which academics and extracurricular events and topics relate to and inform one another.

Advanced—In addition to engaging in consistent and frequent communication with the IN140 cohort faculty member, the CWRR Program suggests that CWRR and University Seminar faculty work together to create connections across the two courses through shared course materials and/or curriculum.  Visiting one another’s classes is also encouraged.  Such visits can provide an opportunity to expose students to the nature of effective collaboration among faculty members and can offer models for their own collaborative efforts.  Ideally, faculty would begin planning, together, their respective courses the Spring before the Fall cohort.  Many faculty work together over the summer to create cohesion and coherence between writing assignments, reading materials and other classroom activities.

5.3      Staley Library
The CWRR Program has established a strong instructional relationship with the Staley Library faculty and staff.  Over the past five years, CWRR directors (currently Dr. Carmella Braniger) and Library Research Instruction Coordinators (currently Joe Hardenbrook) have worked together closely to develop an instructional relationship unique to the private comprehensive educational experience.  Most research universities establish such relationships, but rarely are larger universities and colleges able to provide students with the frequent instructional contact CWRR students have with professionally trained librarians.  A full-time faculty member, with a terminal degree in Library Science, visits the CWRR classroom four times over the one year, two-course sequence.  These visits take place in classrooms, in electronic laboratories, and in the library.  Library faculty are assigned to a variety of CWRR sections and work with CWRR faculty to develop tailored instructional sessions.  In CWRRI, library faculty introduce students to the library and instruct them on basic search skills in a 50-minute session.  Because CWRRII is research-heavy, librarians instruct students in advanced search skills and source evaluation processes during three 50-minute class periods (MWF classes) or two 75-minutes class periods (TTH classes).  Students engage in online learning tutorials, learn how to access subscription databases, are introduced to the Illinois Library Computer Systems Organization (ILCSO), now the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI), are instructed on the validity and use of websites and learn to evaluate the authoritativeness of sources in general.  The librarians prepare classroom activities, create exercises for students to practice research skills and evaluate student learning.  Our partnership with the library is essential in developing students’ abilities to conduct research for academic inquiry, one of our four learning goals.  CWRR faculty are expected both to be in contact with their assigned librarian to help set up class sessions and to attend all sessions led by the librarian.  Such attention demonstrates to students the importance of this instruction.

Library Instruction
6.1      Statement from Staley Research Librarian & Instruction                            Coordinator

The Staley Library Research Instruction Program supports the mission of Millikin University in preparing students for professional success, democratic citizenship in a global community, and a personal life of meaning and value. This corresponds with Staley Library’s learning outcome goals, which focus on finding, understanding and using academic research resources appropriately and effectively.

Although most freshmen are what has popularly been termed “digital natives,” that is, they might be listening to their iPod, instant messaging and surfing the Web simultaneously, their technology skills do not necessarily translate into well developed information-seeking skills. Not unlike most college freshmen, anecdotal evidence shows that most students entering Millikin display an over-reliance on using the Internet for information, and they do not critically evaluate the information that they do use. This is where the Research and Instruction Librarians come into play. The librarians introduce students to the Library catalog, article databases, and web sites of academic quality through hands-on sessions as well as classroom dialogue on plagiarism and how to evaluate different sources of information. 

In addition, students complete several library/research related tutorials and assignments. The librarians strongly encourage that CWRR faculty offer credit for completing these assignments.  This will emphasize not only the importance of the research process, but will set students on the road to research success—not just in CWRR, but throughout their Millikin career. It will also aid the librarians in assessing the effectiveness of our Research Instruction Program.

The Research and Instruction Librarians look forward to working with CWRR faculty and students and are always open to new ideas and suggestions that faculty may have.

6.2      Description of Library Instruction
A full-time faculty member, with a terminal degree in Library Science, visits the CWRR classroom four times over the one year, two course sequence.  These visits take place in classrooms, in electronic laboratories, and in the library.  Library faculty are assigned to a variety of CWRR sections and work with CWRR faculty to develop tailored instructional sessions.  Library faculty introduce students to the library and instruct them on basic search skills in a 50-minute session in CWRRI.  Because CWRRII is research-heavy, librarians instruct students in advanced search skills and source evaluation processes during three 50-minute class periods (MWF classes) or two 75-minutes class periods (TTH classes).  Students engage in online learning tutorials, learn how to access subscription databases, are introduced to the Illinois Library Computer Systems Organization (ILCSO), now the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI), are instructed on the validity and use of websites and learn to evaluate the authoritativeness of sources in general.  CWRR faculty are expected both to be in contact with their assigned librarian to help set up class sessions and to attend all sessions led by the librarian.  Such attention demonstrates to students the importance of this instruction

6.3      Required Library Assignments & Exercises
To complete the library assignments and exercises for CWRRI & II Library Instruction, students need to register for a Library/Research Component BlackBoard course each semester. The librarians will send the instructions for registration and for completing all library assignments and exercises to the CWRR faculty in a timely fashion.  CWRR Faculty are expected to participate in coordinating and planning instruction times with their assigned Library Faculty member, and should plan to ensure that students register for the course and complete all library assignments and exercises.
The following assignments are completed in CWRRI (IN150):

Information Literacy Skills Assessment—This BlackBoard-based assessment will help the librarians evaluate what students know about library and research skills as they enter college. This should be completed before the third week of classes.

CWRRI Millikin Information Literacy Tutorial (MILT)—This online tutorial introduces students to college-level research, helps students become aware of the differences between the library and the web, and discusses plagiarism and how to cite sources. It is accompanied by a BlackBoard-based quiz. This should be completed prior to the class session with the librarian.
The following assignments are completed in CWRR II (IN151):

CWRRII MILT Tutorial #1—This online tutorial covers how to retrieve information (i.e., search strategy, library catalog and databases). It is accompanied by a BlackBoard-based quiz. This should be completed before the first class session with the librarian.

Search Strategy Checklist—This assignment is a two-page worksheet that outlines information sources and keywords for students’ research topics. The assignment addresses how to define a topic, locate background information, define search parameters, locate articles and books and evaluate periodicals and Internet resources. Much of the assignment will be completed during the class sessions with the librarian.

CWRRII MILT Tutorial #2— This online tutorial covers how to evaluate information (i.e., print resources, scholarly vs. popular sources, the Internet). It is accompanied by a BlackBoard-based quiz. This should be completed before the second class session with the librarian (MWF classes) or the last session with the librarian (T/Th classes)

Web Evaluation Assignment—For this assignment, students search for a website on their topic that is of “academic quality” and post it to the BlackBoard Research/Library Component discussion forum. This should be completed before the last class session with the librarian.

Information Literacy Assessment Quiz—This BlackBoard-based quiz will assist the librarians in assessing the skills students have learned during the CWRR sequence. It is to be completed after the last class session with the librarian.
6.4      Sample Syllabus Policy Statement on Instruction
The CWRR Program has a collaborative partnership with Millikin’s research librarians, professionals whose expertise is in finding and evaluating information. As part of this course, then, you will receive instruction on information literacy. As part of that instruction, you will need to complete a variety of assignments.  As with the CWRR artifact, you will not receive a grade for the course if you have not completed the information literacy component.

6.5      Contact Information
Library Wesite, http://www.millikin.edu/staley/research/prevent_plagiarism.asp
Joe Hardenbrook, Library Research Instruction Coordinator
Carmella Braniger, CWRR Director
Karin Borei, Library Director
Randy Brooks, Dean of Teaching and Learning and English Department Chair

Assessment Methods & Processes
              
7.1      Description of Methodology & Points of Data Collection
The CWRR Program has developed several methods for assessing and evaluating student learning in CWRRI & II.  We want to be sure we are communicating our student learning outcome goals to our students.  In addition to surveys, faculty syllabi examination and library assessment, our most important point of data collection for qualitative assessment is student artifact collection.  By collecting and evaluating student artifacts from CWRRI & II, and using rubrics to assess not only students’ reading, writing and research performance, but also their understanding of the importance of reading and writing for personal and professional growth at Millikin University, we are able to determine how effectively the CWRR Program delivers on its promise of education.

Our student learning outcome goals, student artifact identifications and descriptions and the rubrics for assessing the artifacts were developed collaboratively by the CWRR Self-Study Assessment Team and by full-faculty participation in workshops and meetings by those who teach CWRR courses.  Such decision-making processes also allowed us to overcome the challenges of using rubrics for assessment.  These meetings and workshops were conducted according to North Central Accreditation’s suggestions for establishing appropriate assessment requirements.

In an attempt not only to assess what we value in student writing but to evaluate what students value in the CWRR two-semester sequence, we develop and integrate reflection into the curriculum of the program.  Because one of our student learning outcome goals states that students will gain the ability to reflect on the uses of reading and writing in their public and personal lives to better understand themselves, their communities and the world, CWRR faculty decided to implement reflection activities in either CWRRI or II and to collect a reflective piece of writing from students for assessment. 

Through full CWRR faculty workshops and meetings, our program has determined that reflection is valuable for developing students’ interpersonal and intrapersonal skills and for cultivating their inquiry and discovery processes.  Our faculty also values the input and feedback from students concerning their learning experiences.  Through reflection writing, students disclose something about themselves as writers, readers and learners. They also disclose something about their learning needs and the extent to which we are meeting them.  And by including student input in the assessment process, we are able to make changes to the curriculum and assessment processes appropriate to student learning needs.  By focusing the bulk of our assessment on the qualitative evaluation of student artifacts, we keep students at the center of the program and its decision-making processes.

By establishing a variety of assessment methods, the CWRR Program seeks to gain new insights into the effectiveness of our interactions with first-year students.    Collecting student artifacts for evaluation and assessment presents an opportunity to examine the outcomes of all four of our key learning goals in a variety of ways.  Each artifact contributes significantly to measuring the success of our delivery of one or more of the four goals.  The quantitative survey and the qualitative use of reflection in the assessment process allow us to examine the program from the students’ perspectives.  By evaluating all four points of data collection, the CWRR Program hopes to gain an understanding of how well we communicate and deliver on our key learning goals.

7.2      Artifact Descriptions
Reading Response
This 300-word reading response is used to assess IN151 students’ various reading skills such as summarizing, responding, critiquing and synthesizing. The text that students are asked to respond to could be any reading assignment for the whole class. This reading response could take the form of an annotation, a short reading response paper or a reading journal entry. The credit points assigned to this reading response will be up to the individual instructors. To assist students in their reading response, instructors may design guiding questions for the reading assignment. Such a reading response, as we generally agreed, must be collected from the students after detailed instruction and guided practices on the reading strategies that are being assessed. 

Research Essay
This research paper is used to assess IN151 students’ critical writing, research and thinking skills. Individual instructors have the liberty to decide 1) the topics suitable for the research essay; 2) the proper length (between 2,000 and 2,500 words) for the research essay; 3) time allowed for students to complete the research essay; 4) documentation style used for the research essay (MLA, APA, or Chicago Style).  Please ask students to number the pages, double-space the document and include a title page.
Because of the above-mentioned purpose of the research essay collection, it is important that this project be assigned and collected as the last major non-collaborative research project of IN151. To ensure the research paper collection reflects the best quality of IN151 students’ writing, research and thinking skills, instructors will be asked to give detailed guidance and instruction to the students and to allow students sufficient time and chances to revise their paper with feedback from peers and/or instructors. 

Reflection Artifact Collection 
Student reflection can be used to plan, examine and evaluate one’s learning.  Such reflective activities can include asking students to

set goals

develop plans and strategies for their learning

assess the effectiveness of these plans

apply organizational strategies

reinforce what they have learned already   (Nancy Joseph, 2003)
This student reflection piece is used to assess IN151 from the students’ perspective.  (See section 7.5 Reflection Piece Assignment Suggestions for guidance on how to construct appropriate reflection piece assignments).

It is up to the individual CWRR faculty member 1) to decide which suggestion to use for the reflection piece collection and how long the reflection will be, 2) to choose how to use the reflection piece for their own classes and 3) to decide how much credit they want to give to their students for this assignment and how much time they wish to allow their students to write the reflection piece.

However, it is important that the questions for the reflection piece should be well explained and constantly reinforced throughout the course of the semester.  Students should be allowed sufficient time and opportunity to reflect on their writing, reading, and research activities and to revise their reflections before submission. While it is not necessary for faculty members to reveal the assessment nature of the reflection piece to the students, faculty are welcome to do so.  Such discussions could promote a better understanding, on the students’ part, about the importance of submitting their work.  By introducing the discussion of assessment with students, faculty keep open lines of communication with students concerning the course goals and can therefore promote successful student performance in all areas of writing, reading and research.

7.3      Reflection Piece Assignment Suggestions
The following are suggestions for creating effective reflective piece assignments.  Suggestions #1 & #2 ask students to write at the beginning and end of the semester.  Suggestion #3 asks students to respond to their research process and final product, or for all the writing projects in the course.  The questions may be asked over the course of the semester or at the end of the course.  The length of the reflection is up to the instructor.

Reflection Piece Suggestion #1
At the beginning of the semester, ask students to take some time to respond to the following questions.

Questions for the Beginning of the Semester

Why do you write?  What inspires you to express yourself and your ideas?

Why do you read?  What kind of reading do you do?

Why do you research?  When do you engage in research?  What kind of research do you do?

What does it mean to be a critical writer, reader and researcher?

What do you already know about critical writing, reading and research?  How might this kind of reading, writing and research be similar to or different from the kind of reading, writing and research you already practice?

What’s the difference between high quality and low quality critical writing, reading and research skills?

What do you expect to learn about critical writing, reading and research this semester?

What is the importance of learning about critical writing, reading and research?  Why does society value writing, reading and research?

How will you use what you learn about critical writing, reading and research in your personal and professional lives?
At the end of the semester, give the students same set of questions and ask them to respond to them again.  Then return to the students their responses from the beginning of the semester.  Ask them to think about and reflect on what they have learned over the course of the semester based on their two sets of answers; then ask them how they will use what they have learned.

Questions for the End of the Semester

Why do you write?  What inspires you to express yourself and your ideas?

Why do you read?  What kind of reading do you do?

Why do you research? When do you engage in research?  What kind of research do you do?

What does it mean to be a critical writer, reader and researcher?

What’s the difference between high quality and low quality critical writing, reading and research skills?

What did you already know about critical writing, reading and research when you began the course? 

What did you learn about critical writing, reading and research this semester?

What is the importance of learning about critical writing, reading and research?  Why does society value writing, reading and research?

How will you use what you have learned about critical writing, reading and research in your personal and professional lives?
Reflection Piece Suggestion #2
At the beginning of the semester, ask students to set some goals for their own learning.

Questions for the Beginning of the Semester
What do you expect to learn about reading, writing and research this semester? 
Outline one goal for each of the following areas.

Reading:  I want to learn how to . . .

Writing:  I want to learn how to . . .

Research:  I want to learn how to . . .
At the end of the semester, ask students to reflect on their experiences.

Questions for the End of the Semester

What were your expectations for this course, and are those expectations being met?  Why or why not? 

Did you reach the goals you set for yourself?

What piece of writing is your highest quality piece of writing, and why? 

What did you like best and least about our readings, and why? What was your favorite reading, and why?  Give examples.

What did you like – or not like – about the writing assignments, and why?  What was your favorite writing assignment, and why?  Give examples.

What did you like best and least about class discussion and why?

What does it mean to be a critical writer, reader and researcher?

How will you use what you have learned about critical writing, reading and research in your personal and professional lives?
Reflection Piece Suggestion #3
These questions may be asked over the course of the semester or at the end of the course.  Faculty may ask students to respond to their writing process for the research essay or for all the writing projects in the course.

What was your process for deciding on the topic for your research essay?  How did you narrow or broaden your topic to fit the assignment requirements?

What was your process for researching your topic?  Where did you start?  What sources did you initially discover?  How did you revise your research plans to find the most appropriate sources to use in your paper?  How many times did you visit the library, use the library online catalog and access our library’s online periodical databases?

What was your process for reading the resources you found?  Did you closely read each source?  Which sources did you read more closely, and why? What system did you develop for note taking? Did you use index cards?  Double-log entries?  A research notebook?

At what point did you decide on the purpose for the paper?  How did you reach the decision? 

At what point did you decide on the thesis for the paper?  How did you reach the decision?  Did the thesis stay the same or change?

At what point did you arrive at a way to organize the essay? How is the essay currently organized?

What invention activities helped you develop and revise your ideas for the essay?

What did you focus on in your revision process, and why?

What important discoveries did you make about academic discourse as you wrote this essay?  How is the essay a part of an ongoing conversation about the topic you researched?

Why is this research you have conducted valuable to others?  Who is the audience for your research essay?

How was the process for writing this essay similar to or different from the processes you have undergone writing the other essays?

What new, original critical insights did your reach in your research, reading and writing processes, and how did you reach them?

What is high-quality research writing?  What does it mean to be a critical writer, reader and researcher?

How will you use what you have learned about critical writing, reading and research in your personal and professional lives?
7.4      Collection Process
All CWRR artifacts are collected electronically.  The CWRR Program continually works to develop ways to effectively and efficiently collect student artifacts for program evaluation.  Currently, the Program uses a specified BlackBoard course for collecting student work.  Students enroll in the course and post their artifacts under the appropriate faculty member’s Discussion Thread.  Faculty are asked to make submission a requirement for completion of the assignment.  As collection periods approach, instructions for collecting artifacts will be sent out to faculty.  Directions for enrolling in BlackBoard courses and for posting artifacts to the BlackBoard repository course will be made available for students and faculty both electronically and in hard copy format.  Please contact the CWRR Director, Carmella Braniger, with questions about this process.

7.5      Collection Periods
The reading response will be collected in November of each Fall semester from all IN150 sections.  The research paper will be collected during the final exam week of every Spring semester from all IN151 sections.  The reflection piece will be collected during the final week of classes every Spring semester from all IN151 sections.  As collection periods approach, all CWRR faculty will be contacted with specific instructions and guidelines for helping students submit their work.

7.6      Contact Information
CWRR Program Director, Carmella Braniger
Dean of Teaching and Learning and English Department Chair, Randy Brooks
Millikin Accreditation and Assessment Chairs, Randy Brooks & Jamie Comstock

Teaching Materials
8.1      Course Packets
To streamline their course preparation, CWRR faculty members frequently use course packets. Course packets can be useful for Critical Writing, Reading and Research classes for a variety of reasons.  They can:

Reduce expenses for students;

Provide clear organization and overall direction for class;

Help communicate to the students program expectations and goals of the class;

Help create a coherent theme for the classes;

Allow faculty creativity and individual freedom in designing courses;

Provide clear direction for other faculty members who may need to cover  a class in the case of emergency.
The length or size of a course packet generally depends on the individual CWRR faculty member who uses and compiles it. (See section 2 English Department Office Policies and FAQ for information on the cost of course packets, as well as the procedures for having them duplicated for students and charged to their university accounts).  If faculty plan to use a course packet for their teaching, they should be sure to include a statement about Course Packet Fees on their syllabus.  (See 4.1 CWRR Syllabus Audit Form and 4.3 CWRR Suggested Syllabus Statements).

If CWRR faculty want to reduce the size and cost of their course packet, they can upload some of the course readings and assignment guidelines to the BlackBoard Online Learning System accessible to all students in their class.  Faculty could also make an electronic course packet and upload it to the BlackBoard Online Learning System for their students, who may then choose to print it out or simply read it online. (See section 10.6 Using BlackBoard for a full treatment of the BlackBoard Online Learning System).

Whether in hard copy format or electronic, a course packet usually includes one or all of these major documents: readings, detailed and extended syllabi and detailed schedules. Course packets may also include the following:

Assignment guidelines

Assignment submission formats (with examples)

Assignment submission review checklist

Assignment trouble-shooting or FAQ

Reading worksheets

Discussion questions for assigned readings

Chapter outlines

Optional readings and suggested bibliographies

Grammar and style exercises

Samples of student work

Rubrics and grading standards

Writing Center Feedback Forms

Peer Review templates

MLA or APA format standards

Library assignments

Guidelines for evaluating Internet information
For each course packet, one can lawfully reproduce ten percent or one chapter (whichever is greater) of original source text.

8.2      Reading Lists and Texts Used
While preparing for CWRR courses, faculty might find useful the following list of textbooks and articles that have been successfully used by CWRR faculty members in 2005 and 2006.

CWRR I (IN 150)

Readers/Anthologies

Understanding Reading. Frank Smith.

Current Issues and Enduring Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking and Argument. Sylan Barnette, and Hugo Bedau.

Beyond Borders: A Cultural Reader.  Bass, Randall, and Joy Young. 2nd ed.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2003.

Norton Field Guide for Writing and Reading. Richard Bullock. W. W. Norton & Company. 2005. (The section on literary narratives is particularly useful).
A Troubleshooting Guide for Writers:  Strategies and Process. Clouse, Barbara Fine. 4th ed.  Boston:  McGraw Hill, 2005.
Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Environmental Issues. Ed. Thomas A. Easton.
Norton Book of Nature Writing. College edition. Eds. Finch and Elder.
The New World Reader: Thinking and Writing about the Global Community. Ed. Gilbert H. Muller. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2005. 

A Reader for College Writers. 6th Edition. Ed. Santi V. Buscemi. Boston: McGraw Hill.

Language Awareness. Eschholz, Paul, Alfred Rosa, and Virginia Clark. 9th ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2000.

Critical Strategies for Academic Thinking and Writing. Mike Rose, & Malcolm Kiniry.  3rd ed. Bedford/St. Martins, 1998. 

Ways of Reading. David Bartholomae, and Anthony Petrosky. 7th ed. Bedford/St. Martin's, 2005.

Allyn and Bacon Guide to Writing.

On Writing: A Process Reader. Wendy Bishop.

Language: Readings in Language and Culture. Eds. Clark, Virginia, Paul A Eschholz, and Alfred Rosa. 6th ed. New York: Bedford/St. Martin's, 1998.

The Composition of Everyday Life. Mauk, John and John Metz.
Handbooks

The Bedford Handbook. Diane Hacker.  6th ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2002.

Writer's Inc:  A Student Handbook for Writing and Learning. Patrick Sebranek. Great Source Education Group. 2000.

The Little Brown Handbook: Brief Version. Jane Aaron. Second edition (2004).

Pocket Style Manual. Diana Hacker. Bedford/St. Martin's. 4th Spiral edition. 1999.

The St. Martin's Handbook. Andrea Lunsford. 5th edition.

Rules for Writers. Diana Hacker. 5th edition.  2004.

Keys for Writers. Ann Raimes.  4th edition. Houghton Mifflin, 2005.

A Writers Reference. Diana Hacker.  Bedford/St. Martin’s. 2003.

A Troubleshooting Guide for Writers. Barbara Clouse. McGraw-Hill. 2004.
Non-fiction

Understanding Reading. Frank Smith.

Me Talk Pretty One Day. David Sedaris.

In the Heart of the Sea. Nathaniel Philbrick. Penguin.

Illiterate America. Jonathan Kozol. New York: New American Library, 1985.

Narrative. Frederick Douglass.  New York: Signet, 1997.

 Connections. Judith A Stanford.

Letters from a Stoic. Seneca.

A Room of One's Own. Virginia Woolf. San Diego: Harvest, 1989.

Tuesdays with Morrie. Mitch  Albom.

Stranger than Fiction. Chuck Palahniuk.
Essays

“Gorgias.” Plato.

“From the Inside Out.” Barbara Mellix

“I Will Explain It to You: Lecturing and Listening.” Debra Tannen.

“The Library Card.” Richard Wright

“Writing with Style.” Kurt Vonnegut.

“Letter from Birmingham Jail.” Martin Luther King, Jr..

“I Want a Wife.” Judy Brady.

“Learning to Read.” Fredrick Douglass.

“Clamorous to Learn.” Eudora Welty.

“How Teachers Make Children Hate Reading.” John Holt.

“College Is a Waste of Time and Money.” Caroline Bird.
CWRR II(IN 151)
Readers/ Anthologies

Speculations: An Anthology for Writing, Reading, and Research. Ed. Jason Landrum. (With strong emphasis on knowledge, information, and technological literacy).

The Curious Researcher. Bruce Ballenger.

The Aims of Argument: A Brief Guide. Eds. Timothy W. Crusius, and Carolyn E. Channell. McGraw-Hill Company, 2003.

Critical Theory Today. Lois Tyson.

Essentials of Argument. Nancy Wood.

What’s Language Got to Do With It. Keith Walters.

Ways of Reading. David Bartholomae.

Signs of Life in the USA: Readings on Popular Culture for Writers. Eds. Sonia Maasik and Jack Solomon. 5th Edition.

Everything's an Argument: With Readings. Eds. Andrea A. Lunsford, John J. Ruszkiewicz, and Keith Walters. 3rd edition.  Boston:  Bedford/St. Martin's, 2004. 

Academic Writing:  An Introduction.  Janet Giltrow.  Broadview Press.  2005.
The Craft of Revision. Donald Murray. Heinle. 5th edition. 2003.
Handbooks

The Bedford Handbook. Diane Hacker.  6th ed. Boston: St. Martin's, 2002.

Writer's Inc:  A Student Handbook for Writing and Learning. Patrick Sebranek. Great Source Education Group. 2000.

The Little Brown Handbook: Brief Version. Jane Aaron. Second edition (2004).

Pocket Style Manual. Diana Hacker. Bedford/St. Martin's. 4th Spiral edition. 1999.

The St. Martin's Handbook. Andrea Lunsford. 5th edition.

Rules for Writers. Diana Hacker. 5th edition.  2004.

Keys for Writers. Ann Raimes.  4th edition. Houghton Mifflin, 2005.

A Writers Reference. Diana Hacker.  Bedford/St. Martin’s. 2003.

A Troubleshooting Guide for Writers. Barbara Clouse. McGraw-Hill. 2004.
Non-fiction

Dr. Tatiana’s Sex Advice to All Creations. Olivia Judson.

Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World. Mark Kurlansky.

The Argument Culture. Deborah Tannen.

War on the War on Terror. Terry Jones.

Humanity:  A Moral History of the Twentieth Century. Jonathan Glover.

The Symposium of Plato.

Sin Boldly. David R. Williams. 2nd edition.

Lying About Hitler. Richard J. Evans.

Addicted to War. Joel Andreas.

The Philosophy of Horror or Paradoxes of the Heart. Noel Carroll.
Essays

“The Question Concerning Technology.” Martin Heidegger.

“Panopticism.” Michael Foucault.

“The Achievement of Desire.” Richard Rodriguez.

“When We Dead Awaken: Writing As Re-vision.” Adrienne Rich.

“Take Women Students Seriously.” Adrienne Rich.

“Boring from Within: The Art of the Freshman Essay.” William G. Perry. Jr.

“Mommy, What Does ‘Nigger’ Mean?’” Gloria Naylor.

“Period Styles: A Punctuation History.” Ellen Lupton and J. Abbott Miller.
8.3      Sample Syllabi
Because all CWRR faculty are required to submit syllabi to the English Department Office Manager, who passes them along to the Arts & Science Secretary, Mary Peters, sample syllabi are always available for review.  Contact Cindie Zelhart or Mary Peters for samples.  Many faculty also contribute syllabi to the English Department BlackBoard Repository.  Contact the CWRR Director for instructions on how to access these resources.

Teaching Resources and Support
9.1      Sample Assignments for each Student Learning Outcome Goal

1. Read and critique texts actively, deliberately and carefully.

Summary

Response

Summary & Response

Double-entry Journal

Rhetorical Analysis
2. Write polished, informed essays for personal, public  and/or specialized audiences.

Personal Narratives

Letters (for specific audiences)

Syntheses and Analyses

Arguments
3. Conduct research to participate in academic inquiry.

       Annotated Bibliography

       Double-entry Journal

       Working Works Cited Page

       Research Essay

       Process Narratives or Reflections
4. Reflect on the uses of reading and writing in their public and personal lives to better understand themselves, their communities and the world.
 

Literacy narratives

Self-evaluations

Research Journals

Reflection Essays

Process Narratives
           
9.2      Getting Started
            9.2.1   Getting Started with IN150 

          Checklist for IN150/CWRR1
1.  Before the semester begins:

Order books through the Millikin University Bookstore:      mubookstore@millikin.edu

Order desk copies through Cindie Zelhart

Set up or recycle BlackBoard sites

Review sample syllabi/audit form, course schedule template (see Mike    George for template), possible assignments

Compile syllabus, which should include Student Learning Outcome Goals, required CWRR syllabus statements, a description of student artifact collection, holidays and breaks, add/drop/withdraw dates, textbook requirements and library sessions; the syllabus may also include MLA formatting information, instructions on how to send attachments, instructions on how to post assignments to BlackBoard, an explanation of the Academic Alert System, attendance, late work and missing work policies, as well as other information pertinent to the course.

Compile course packet, if one will be used, which may include the syllabus, readings, writing assignments, policies, course schedule, bibliography (See section 8.1 Course Packets)

Contact IN140 cohort (ask CWRR Director, Carmella Braniger, Dead of Teaching and Learning, Randy Brooks or IN140 Director, Josh Hayes for cohort information)
2.  At least two weeks before classes start:

Bring course syllabus to the English Department Office Manager or directly to Duplicating Services (SH106) for copying

Bring the course packet (if one is being used) to the English Department Office Manager or directly to Duplicating Services (SH106) for copying

Bring handouts for the first two weeks of classes to the English Department Office Manager or directly to Duplicating Services (SH106) for copying

Schedule class session(s) with librarian

Contact IN140 cohort (see Carmella Braniger, Randy Brooks or Josh Hayes)

Get on all faculty listserves

Find classrooms; reschedule rooms if necessary (email Clay Gerhardt)
3.  The first day of classes:

Print rosters from MU Online

Build class email list

In class (suggested activities): do introductions, review syllabus,         engage in a sample of what the class will do or be like during the semester
4.  Suggested activities for the second day of classes:

discuss a reading assignment;

ask students to write a diagnostic essay;

engage with the topic or theme of the course;

work in small groups;

discuss reading and writing strategies (pre-reading, annotation, prewriting, drafting, revising, editing)
5.  Sometime during the first two weeks of classes:

Invite Writing Center tutors to talk to class (about five minutes)

Give a small writing assignment (e.g., reading or double-entry journal,   summary/response, diagnostic essay)

Assign first major essay

Establish peer review expectations
Sample Assignments
Generally, faculty members assign three to six major papers over the course of the semester.  In addition, faculty members assign reading responses, process narratives, and reflection pieces. Typically, the major papers are between 3-5 pages, depending on the instructor. Others opt for longer papers with fewer major paper assignments. Many faculty members begin with a personal narrative of some kind and progress to different forms of academic writing. Faculty members may stress some form of analysis, critical reading and persuasion, for example.  Because students are asked to submit a reflection artifact during the second semester course, many faculty integrate reflection into the first semester course as they move students from personal to academic writing.  Assignments and rubrics may be found by accessing the course reserve in BlackBoard.

Sample Handouts

Peer review sheets

Self-evaluations

Rubrics

Collaborative evaluations

Process narratives

Writing tips (e.g., thesis statements, topic sentences, transitions,        paragraphing)

Writing Center links to MLA, APA, Purdue OWL
Sample handouts may be found at the writing center’s link,
< http://www.millikin.edu/wcenter/>, at Purdue’s Online Writing Center (OWL) http://owl.english.purdue.edu/ and by accessing the CWRR course reserve in BlackBoard http://blackboard.millikin.edu/. The course reserve for CWRR has sample syllabi, rubrics, writing tips, peer review sheets, self-evaluations, etc.

            9.1.2   Getting Started with IN151 

Differences from IN150 Preparation

Schedule a week’s worth of library sessions (3 days total for MWF classes, 2 days total for TR classes)

Include library information

Assign points or percentages of final grade for all library assignments

CWRR II places greater emphasis on research.  Every student enrolled in IN151 completes an independent research project by the end of the semester.  The focus of this course should be on the academic research process, including how to gather, evaluate and effectively use academic resources to make connections among and make conclusions about ideas, relationships and important issues.

While argumentation is a significant aspect of the course, students should be encouraged to develop unique, individual issues and relationships about which to write the research essay.  Topics papers, such as marijuana use, abortion and other overused topics are discouraged.
Sample assignments

Double-entry Journals (or other reading journals)

Annotated Bibliographies

Summary & Responses

Proposals

Reflective Journals

Research Essays

Process Narratives   
Sample handouts

Peer Review Sheets

Self-Evaluations

Rubrics

Collaborative Evaluations

Process Narrative instructions

Writing tips (e.g., thesis statements, topic sentences,    transitions, paragraphing)

Writing Center links to MLA, APA, Purdue OWL

Double-entry Journal instructions

Summary/paraphrase

Logos, Ethos, Pathos handouts

Logical Fallacies

Reading with and against the grain

Audience
Sample handouts may be found at the writing center’s link,
< http://www.millikin.edu/wcenter/>, at the Purdue’s Online Writing Center (OWL) http://owl.english.purdue.edu/, and by accessing the CWRR course reserve in BlackBoard http://blackboard.millikin.edu/. The course reserve for CWRR has sample syllabi, rubrics, writing tips, peer review sheets, self-evaluations, etc.

9.3      Resources & Support

Reporting Plagiarism
Academic Dishonesty will not be tolerated at Millikin University.  The CWRR Program requires all faculty to include an Academic Honesty statement on all syllabi (See 4.2 CWRR Required Syllabus Statements.)  If a faculty member suspects a student of cheating, plagiarizing, falsifying information, or any other dishonest act while performing academic or University work, the faculty member should:

Contact the Director of CWRR (Dr. Carmella Braniger) to discuss the matter.  The Director will work with the faculty member to make a reasonable inquiry or investigation to determine whether it is likely that the student’s conduct was intentional.  If necessary, the Director may contact the Dean of Teaching and Learning (Dr. Randy Brooks).

After a meeting with the Director, discuss the implications with the student(s) involved, including specific consequences of the dishonest conduct.  The Director will be happy to meet along with the faculty member and student if necessary.
Most first year students do not intentionally engage in academic dishonesty.  These students simply need proper instruction on correctly citing sources and guidance on how to avoid plagiarism.  The CWRR Program encourages its faculty to discuss with their students the definition of plagiarism, its consequences, implications and ways to avoid it.

If the student’s conduct is determined to be intentional, the faculty member should inform the student that she or he will suffer the consequences of his or her actions.    For a full description of the consequences for such extreme cases, see Millikin’s most recent Academic Bulletin pages 21-22.  (For specific information on how to help students avoid plagiarism, see section 10.5 Preventing Plagiarism.)

The Writing Center (A Statement from the Director)
The Writing Center serves all levels of writers, from beginning to advanced, and attempts to overcome the stereotype that this is a place where only “remedial” students come for help. We view writing here as an ongoing process, and we help students at every point of that process, from understanding readings and interpreting assignments to brainstorming, organizing, drafting and editing. Overall, we want to help students understand their own writing processes and not just "fix" a particular problem. The Center believes that students can accomplish and learn much more if they attend regularly to work on ongoing concerns rather than just coming for one or two visits to work on short-term problems. We also strongly believe that communication with faculty is essential to Writing Center success. Thus, we make sure faculty and students alike are aware of what we do and the services we offer.

It is our belief that the best tutoring is often relatively non-directive. We want to engage the writer, to elicit her or his own ability to see weaknesses, and to revise while maintaining ownership of her or his text. It is rarely, if ever, our function to tell writers what or how to write. Also, although the manner in which we tutor is informed by several strands of pedagogy, as well as by individual strengths among tutors, our firmest base is the Conversational Model as drawn by Kenneth Bruffee. The writer and the tutor work in partnership, striving to accomplish a shared goal in a comfortable, facilitative, social interchange.

The Writing Center also offers a variety of tutor-conducted, evening workshops throughout the year that address specific student writing needs. Workshop topics include brainstorming and thesis statements, grammar and punctuation, plagiarism and MLA and APA documentation styles. Many professors offer extra credit for attendance at these sessions, and the professor can request a list of his/her attendees from the Writing Center Director.

A professor who discovers that one of his or her students requires extra help but not necessarily placement in IN150E can contact the Writing Center Director about regular, scheduled tutorials that will focus on that student’s specific needs. Occasionally a student may be weak in one or two areas that can be readily addressed by a number of regular meetings with a Writing Center tutor.

The Writing Center is open from 1-10 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 6-10 p.m. on Sunday.  While walk-ins are welcome, scheduled appointments take priority. Students are encouraged to make appointments by calling the Writing Center at 424-6353 or emailing wcenter@mail.millikin.edu.   All student visits are documented, and  students may request that faculty receive a copy of their Contact Form. We will send the form via email, which is set up such that faculty can easily route it to a folder for their convenience.

Academic Alert System
General Information
The Academic Alert System is a systematic method of notifying all stakeholders (student, instructor and advisor) when a student is experiencing academic difficulties. Instructors concerned about a student's performance may submit an academic alert via MU Online. Both the student and his/her advisor receive an email notification that an alert has been submitted, and details of the alert can be viewed by accessing MU Online. Through the Academic Alert System, instructors and advisors prompt students to take corrective action to improve their academic performance.

Instructors: Submitting an Academic Alert
1.Log onto MU Online at https://muonline.millikin.edu/
2.Click on Faculty Services
3.Click on Academic Alert System
4.Select the current term and the course and click "Submit,"
5.The course roster appears. Click "add" next to a student's name to submit an academic alert.

Advisors: Viewing an Academic Alert
1.Log onto MU Online at https://muonline.millikin.edu/
2.Click on Faculty Services
3.Click on Advising Menu
4.Click on "View Advisee List"
5.Select the current term and click "View Advisee List"
6.The advisee list appears. Click "alert" next to a student's name to view the details of the alert.

Guidelines for Using the Academic Alert System
1.  Utilize the academic alert system early in the semester, particularly for class attendance.
Faculty should make every attempt to utilize the Academic Alert System as early in the semester as possible. Submitting an academic alert at the first sign of difficulty allows students and advisors more time for corrective action (seeking help during office hours, tutoring, dropping the course, etc.) than submitting an alert at a point where options have become limited.

In addition, faculty are strongly encouraged to utilize the Academic Alert System for attendance during the first three weeks of the semester. Students who "start behind" by missing a substantial number of classes early in the term are more likely to "stay behind" for the duration of the semester. In addition, excessive absence can be an indicator of more serious problems that are likely affecting the student's performance in other classes. The sooner that students and advisors are alerted to these problems, the more time there is for corrective action.

2.  Develop an academic alert policy for the academic unit.
To ensure the consistency and effectiveness of the Academic Alert System within the academic unit, faculty  members may wish to develop a formal policy governing how faculty, advisors and students will utilize the system.

Questions faculty may want to address in the policy include:

--For what specific reasons will faculty submit an academic alert?
--At what point in the semester are alerts most effective (i.e. timing of use)?
--How will academic advisors in the unit respond to the alert?
--What corrective actions should students take upon receipt of the alert?

3.  Communicate with students about the Academic Alert System.
Many students become confused upon receiving an academic alert, particularly students who have never received an alert or have never heard of the Academic Alert System. Clearly articulate the purpose of the Academic Alert System and remind students of those who are notified when an alert has been submitted (instructor, advisor and student). Assure students that alerts are not a part of any permanent record and exist only to help them be successful.

4.  Use the "Other" option to clarify the reason for the alert and to call the student to action.
The most effective academic alerts are those that prompt students to take corrective action. Use the "Other" text box within the academic alert system to articulate specific steps that students should take in order to improve performance (go to tutoring, come to office hours, visit the Writing Center, etc.)

Contacts For Academic Probation
The following contacts are responsible for coordinating communication between a student on academic probation or probationary enrollment and his or her professor: Linda Slagell, Josh Hayes and Candace Baker.
If faculty are contacted by them, faculty may release personal/academic information about the student in question. The students have signed waiver forms in accordance with F.E.R.P.A.  (See section 9.3 Contacts for office locations, telephone numbers, and email addresses.)

Conferences
In order to assist students in writing polished, informed essays and to reinforce the student-teacher relationship, the CWRR Program encourages student-teacher conferences.  Many faculty members choose to conference at least twice a semester.  There are many different options for conferencing: individual conferencing, in class conferencing while other students work on a task, email conferencing, and group conferencing.  Conferences may be conducted during class time.

Midterm
In addition to faculty submission of midterm grades to MU Online, midterm should be a time of reflection for both students and teachers. At midterm, progress and accomplishments should be reviewed and reinforced.  Faculty may revisit course goals either by discussion or assignment. Students may write self-evaluation pieces, concept maps, or one-minute papers.

Last Week of Classes
During the last week of classes, faculty should spend time reviewing goals and celebrating accomplishments. Some faculty choose to have students present papers during the final week, write reflections or self-evaluations and address questions/concerns about the writing projects. Course evaluations may be distributed during this time.

Final Exam Day
Classes must meet during the scheduled final exam time. Some faculty specify this day as the submission day for the final writing project, after which students are asked to write a personal reflective piece or self-evaluation. Others use the time to provide students the opportunity to orally present a project or research essay.  Course evaluations may be distributed at this time, as well. In order to receive more specific course feedback, some faculty create an additional evaluation form, which may also be distributed on finals day.

9.4      Contacts

Randy Brooks, Chair, English Department, and Dean of Teaching and Learning, Library 014A, 424-6264, rbrooks@mail.millikin.edu

Carmella Braniger, Assistant Professor, English Department, and CWRR Director, Shilling 402C, 362-6466, cbraniger@mail.millikin.edu

Joe Hardenbrook, Library Instruction Coordinator, Research/Instruction Librarian and Education Technologist, Staley Library 106, 424-3692, jhardenbrook@mail.millikin.edu

Cindie Zelhart, Secretary and Office Manager, English Department, Shilling 402A, 424-6250, czelhart@mail.millikin.edu

Mary Peters, Administrative Assistant, Office of the Dean of Arts & Sciences, Shilling 209, 424-6205, mpeters@mail.millikin.edu

Jacque Wrigley, Executive Secretary to the Vice President of Academic Affairs, Shilling 213, 424-6220, jwrigley@mail.millikin.edu

Jamie Comstock, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Shilling 213, 424-6220, jcomstock@mail.millikin.edu

Linda Slagell, Director of Academic Development, Shilling 205C, 420-6622, lslagell@mail.millikin.edu

Josh Hayes, Assistant Director of Academic Development and IN140 University Seminar Director, Shilling 205D, 424-3511, jhayes@mail.millikin.edu

Candace Baker, Assistant Director of Academic Development, Shilling 205E, 362-6470, cbaker@mail.millikin.edu

Michael O’Conner, Honors Program Director, Shilling Hall 402E, 424-5096, moconner@mail.millikin.edu

Judi Crowe, Writing Center Director, Staley Library 203, 424-6353, wcenter@mail.millikin.edu

Barb Bolser, Continuing Education Services Coordinator and Research/Instruction Librarian, Staley Library, 420-6719, bbolser@mail.millikin.edu

Amanda Pippitt, Access Services Coordinator, Staley Library 104; 424-3957, apippitt@mail.millikin.edu

Information Technology Helpdesk and Desktop Support, Shilling 114, 362-6488, infotech@mail.millikin.edu

Media Services, Shilling 105, 424-6238

Duplicating Services, Shilling 106, 424-6352, duplicating@mail.millikin.edu

Walt Wessel, Registrar, Gorin 16, 424-6217, wwessel@mail.millikin.edu

Kevin Graham, Director of Counseling Services, Health and Counseling Center, 424-6360, kgraham@mail.millikin.edu

Clay Gerhard, Coordinator, Campus Scheduling, Richards Treat University Center, 121C, 424-6206

Safety and Security, Walker Hall, 464-8888
Best Teaching Practices in the CWRR Electronic Classroom
10.1 Overview of Spaces and Technology Available
The Information Technology Department, in accordance with the mission of the university, provides service to the Millikin community. They strive to deliver excellent support in the use of academic and administrative technology, and to provide faculty and students with a diversity of technology spaces to be used for teaching. Classrooms utilized by the English Department at Millikin University can be divided into three different technology usage categories: traditional classrooms with network infrastructure and cabling for using mobile computer units (PC MoComp), technology classrooms with instructor podiums, and computer labs with instructor podiums and computers for each student. All classrooms at Millikin University have network infrastructure and cabling.

The Traditional Classroom

Traditional classrooms have network infrastructure and cabling for using mobile computer units (PC MoComp). Media Services offers a variety of equipment for classroom use including the portable PC MoComp. These units work much like the Instructors podium style work station consisting of a Pentium PC computer with 4 2.8GHz 512MB memory 40GB hard drive, CDRW/DVD combo drive,
Permanent projector and projection unit and sound system. To schedule or reserve a PC MoComp or other equipment fill out the online form at http://www.millikin.edu/it/UniversityServices/MediaServices/DeliveryForm.asp , or call (x6238) or stop in (Shilling Hall Room 106).

Technology Classrooms and Computer Labs

Many of the classrooms have technology ready for use, but the equipment available in each room may vary. The following charts list technology classrooms and computer labs available for English Department use.
 
Shilling Hall

Room number  Kind of room
 Technology available
 
Shilling 303
Shilling 310
Shilling 327
 Technology classroom
 Permanent ceiling projectors, PC computers for projection, screens, VCRs and sound systems, laptop hookups
PDS P4/2.4GHz, 512MB, 40GB hard drive, CDRW/DVD combo drive
 
Shilling 315
 Technology classroom
with tables
 Permanent ceiling projectors, PC computers for projection, document cameras, screens, VCRs and sound systems, laptop hookups
PDS P4/2.4GHz, 512MB, 40GB hard drive, CDRW/DVD combo drive
 
Shilling 317
 Lecture Hall style
Technology classroom
Tiered seating, chairs with retractable desks
 Permanent ceiling projectors, PC computers for projection, document cameras, screens, VCRs and sound systems, laptop hookups
PDS P4/2.4GHz, 512MB, 40GB hard drive, CDRW/DVD combo drive
 
Shilling 420
Shilling 421
 Technology classroom
With desks
 Smartboards (interactive whiteboards that work with windows applications, a PC computer, projector, screen, sound system and VCR, laptop hookups) Podium-style
PDS P4/2.4GHz, 512MB, 40GB hard drive, CDRW/DVD combo drive
 
Shilling 323 Tabor Computer Lab
 This is a 34-computer lab. This room may be reserved for blocks of time if a computer lab is not wanted all semester
 34 Pentium 4 2.8Ghz, 1GB RAM, CDRW/DVD combo drives, 17" monitors.
1 HP LaserJet 4200N Printer,
Computer podium with projection
Permanent ceiling projector, screen, instructor podium and PC computer.
 

ADM-Scovill Hall

Room number  Kind of room
 Technology available
 
Room 5 (West Lab)
Room 6 (East Lab)
 The multimedia computer classroom with full multimedia capabilities.  This is a 30-computer lab, with machines.
 Pentium 4 3.0GHz, 1GB memory, 40GB hard drives, CDRW/DVD combo drives
17" LCD monitors
Also, the teaching podium offers the full multimedia suite found in all multimedia classrooms:Ceiling-mounted projector and screen: NEC MT-1065 projector, AMX 17" Touchpanel and control system, DVD,
VCR, EV7100 audio amplifier and JBL Control 25AV speakers, Samsung SDP 950 document camera, Extron switcher
 
Room 109
Room 110
 Technology classroom
with tables
 Room 109 of the ADM-Scovill Hall features full multimedia capabilities and a powerful computer system. The computer features: Pentium 4 3.0GHz, 1GB memory 40GB hard drives, CDRW/DVD combo drives, Ceiling-mounted projector and screen.
Also, the teaching podium offers the full multimedia suite found in all multimedia classrooms: NEC MT-1065 projector
AMX 17" Touchpanel and control system, DVD, VCR, EV7100 audio amplifier and JBL Control 25AV speakers, Samsung SDP 950 document camera, Extron switcher
 

Staley Library

Room number
 Kind of room
 Technology available
 
Library Room 8
 Technology classroom
with tables
 Instructors podium with computer:
Pentium 4 2.8GHz
512MB memory
40GB hard drive
CDRW/DVD combo drive
Permanent projector
VCR
Document Camera
Sound System
Big screen projection system
 
Library Room 13
 Technology classroom
Conference tables, chairs with rollers
Lab is used predominately by MBA classes.
 Instructors podium with computer:
Pentium 4 2.8GHz
512MB memory
40GB hard drive
CDRW/DVD combo drive
Permanent projector
VCR
Document Camera
Sound System
Big screen projection system
Lab is used only by MBA classes.
 
Library Room 18 (small room)
Library Room 23 (large room)
 Technology classroom
With desks
 Instructors podium with computer:
Pentium 4 2.8GHz
512MB memory
40GB hard drive
CDRW/DVD combo drive
Permanent projector
VCR
Document Camera
Sound System
Big screen projection system
 

 

While the Woods Suite 5 Technology classrooms A-E are also available, they are located two blocks south of the main campus, can be difficult to get to quickly if one teaches elsewhere back-to-back and are generally used by the Education and PACE Programs.

A view of each Technology classroom and its description can be seen at the IT website address http://www.millikin.edu/it/campustech/classrooms/ and computer labs at http://www.millikin.edu/it/CampusTech/Labs/default.asp. All rooms on campus and descriptions can be viewed at http://r25.millikin.edu.

Contact Information and Room Assignments

Classroom Requests

Each semester instructors must fill out a request form for desired classrooms. This is especially important if a technology classroom or computer lab is needed. These forms are available from and delivered to either the English Department Office Manager, Cindie Zelhart, or Mary Peters, the Secretary to the Dean of Arts and Sciences. If a computer lab is needed only for a short time, the English Department Office Manager can arrange this.

Technology Training and Trouble Shooting

Anyone with a valid Millikin University ID card is allowed to attend or request training sessions. For training on all desktop software or to report problems, call the Help desk/Training Coordinator at x6488. Technology work order requests can also be made on line at http://www.millikin.edu/it/techservices/WorkOrders/workorder.asp.  Also, many questions about software and support can be answered at the IT website: http://www.millikin.edu/it.

All incoming students will be trained briefly to use most of the ubiquitous software (GroupWise email, MUOnline administrative software, BlackBoard) during Summer Orientation and Registration and during First Week.  Librarians will come into all first year writing courses to train students to use research-related software such as the catalogue and online databases. 

10.2 Current Issues in Digital Teaching

            10.2.1 Using Document Software in Technology Rooms

          Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word—or any word processing program—is a powerful tool to use in a technology room. Uses for the software include, but are not limited to:

Use
 Goal
 
Display/Edit Student Papers
 Revision strategies
 
Group Composition
 Invention, revision
 
Display Sample Writing
 Critical reading
 
Display Assigned Text
 Critical reading
 
Group Notetaking
 Critical reading/writing/thinking
 

Display/Edit Student Papers

Displaying selected student papers during class is an effective way to demonstrate revision using actual student writing. The student whose paper is displayed gains by having his or her work critiqued by the entire class. The class benefits by seeing how one of their peers addresses the assignment. This can be done at any stage in the writing process, from prewriting through proofreading, and for any number of purposes associated with these stages. It can also be used to demonstrate the use of specific techniques.

Group Composition

A whole-class paper is often an interesting exercise for students. The instructor should be able to type relatively fast, or select a student with good typing skills to act as secretary. Then the paper begins, with students contributing to each sentence of the writing. It’s often helpful to have a debriefing session after such an assignment. What did the students learn about invention? About the topic? About collaboration?

Display Sample Writing

Many instructors use model writing—examples of particular types of essays. When discussing this type of writing, displaying it on the screen is helpful. It forces students to look up from the paper text and to engage more actively with the sample.

Display Assigned Text

Similarly, displaying an assigned text is often helpful during large group discussion. Again, it forces students to look up from their texts/notes and to engage with the text on a different level.

Group Notetaking

Similar to displaying an assigned text, doing group note taking is beneficial in that the entire group can comment upon a text that has been assigned for the day. This provides students with a variety of perspectives on the text. It is helpful to have prepared some questions to think about ahead of time, rather than to jump into a free-for-all discussion, though the latter can also be beneficial. The instructor takes notes in Word as students offer thoughts and comment upon each other’s comments.

For all of these techniques, two pieces of Microsoft Word are essential: the highlight tool and the text color tool. The default toolbar does not display the highlight tool, though it does display the text color tool. The highlight tool acts like a highlighter. Once the instructor selects the desired color, he or she need only click on the highlight button to highlight the selected text. This is good if the instructor wants a piece of text to stand out for a long period of time. If she or he wants the text to stand out for a short period, just highlight it. The background will turn black and the text white, providing a different contrast that highlights the text. The text color tool is also good for highlighting text. It is more permanent, yet less intrusive than the highlight tool. If one wants to emphasize all transitions in a paragraph, for instance, he or she can highlight them with the mouse, then click the text color button. The text changes color. This way students can see all transitions on the screen.

Adobe Acrobat

If faculty members assign electronic readings for students, these texts, generally, will not be in Word format. Most will be in Acrobat format (pdf files). While one cannot use the same tools for Acrobat that he or she can in Word, there are ways to use pdf files in class, if the instructor is in the right room.

Several rooms in Shilling have flat panel displays on the front table. These displays have a stylus, which the instructor needs to check out from University Services. The stylus acts like a pen, and the marks made on the flat panel display are projected to the screen, allowing one to underline, circle and make notes. The rooms in Scovill will eventually have a similar technology available for use.

Displaying Essays and Readings

Models of good writing also benefit many students. If in a technology classroom this can be especially useful. Essays or reading assignments can be displayed on screen for class discussions, averting students’ eyes away from the desktop.

Enhancing Student Learning Through Web Page Design

Students can benefit greatly from knowing how to create a web page, a form of writing that is deeply embedded in our culture. An HTML editor is a tool used to create and maintain hypertexts or web pages. It has many applications for use in the first year writing classroom by both instructor and student. 

Use Goals
Creating a Homepage Communication with students
Recruitment tool
 
Posting Syllabi Students have policies, contact information of instructors and class requirements available
Student Created Hypertext Encourages critical reading, encourages other kinds of reading, writing and critical thinking
Publishing Student Work Awareness of audience and place
Displaying Essays and Readings Show the connection with visual design, information architecture and texts.  Engage students in visual rhetoric and in making associations
Creating Interactive Assignment Review, clarify concepts, point out writing strategies or ask questions

Creating a Homepage
Many instructors have websites (or homepages) where they post syllabi, readings, teaching philosophies, vitae and useful information for students. This can be an important tool for keeping students informed of class activities, announcements and important information. Having this information on BlackBoard works well, but if students forget their BlackBoard security information, a web site open to the public could be beneficial.

Posting Syllabi

Posting syllabi on the web can have many advantages. A copy of policies, assignments and instructor contact information is readily available. Links can be made from the syllabus to further explain assignments, display examples of assignments, post due dates or extend reading/lecture information. However, faculty may want to be careful about some types of information that they post on the world wide web.  For example, some movie distributors check to see if faculty are listing commercial films on their syllabus.  Always make sure to follow all copyright and educational free use laws and regulations. 

Student Created Hypertext

Student writers can benefit in several important ways when taught to compose hypertexts. College students spend a great deal of time online where documents are linked in many different ways. Creating hypertexts encourages an awareness of the associations between one set of ideas and/or concepts and others. This particularly supports getting students to look at their topics from different angles. Most importantly, it encourages student awareness of voice and audience; published hypertexts are seen globally so the students have a “real” audience, a setting which is sometimes difficult to create with as more traditional approach. Visual rhetoric also comes to the forefront in a more direct way. White space, bulleting and visual transitions are fun and more evident. The relationship with visual design, information architecture and text generation also become important issues to consider. 

Publishing Student Work

Similarly, publishing student work online gives the student a sense of place. Because the web is such a public place, students are more conscious of where they are in relationship to others. As students become more conscious of their writing through web publishing, editing and good writing techniques become more important to them.

Creating Interactive Reading Assignments & Games

Portions of reading assignments can be hyperlinked to additional resources. This can be used to clarify concepts, point out writing strategies or ask questions of specific areas of the text. Games are also very easy to create using a web publisher. A Jeopardy game can be easily created and displayed. This is especially useful for review sessions.

Millikin University supports the use of hypertext composers through purchasing FrontPage, which is available under program files on most university computers. A CD of the program is available for home use at the IT office in Shilling. For help or training on the use of FrontPage, call the IT Help desk at 362-6488.  There are also many free hypertext editing tools available on the internet.  Even Microsoft Word has a "save as web page" feature.

            10.2.2 Computer Classrooms

Computer classrooms present a wider range of tools for the instructor, in addition to the tools listed above, which all can be used in a computer classroom. This section deals with ways to use MS Word when students each have a computer on which they can work. To summarize, the following are popular—though not exhaustive—ways to conduct classes in a computer classroom using Word:

Activity
 Goal
 
Workshop
 Critical writing, invention, revision, proofreading,
clustering, freewriting, reflection
 
Musical papers
 Invention, revision
 
PeeP  Peer Review
 Revision, proofreading
 
Fast write
 Reflection, critical reading
 
Note taking
 Critical reading
 

Workshop

The writing workshop can cover a wide-range of activities and can happen at any stage of the writing process. In general, when teaching writing in a computer lab, faculty should include a good bit of workshopping, since students have a means of writing, exchanging, responding to, revising and saving their work.  Faculty can ask students to workshop for any goal or purpose they see fit.

Musical Papers

This activity asks students to write a certain amount or for a specific period of time on the same topic. Once they’re done, they change machines, read what the previous student has written and continue the paper. This can help to develop critical readings skills (they need to fill in gaps and expand upon what the previous student had written), as well as a variety of other writing skills.

Peer Review

Students can conduct on-screen peer review, which is similar to a typical paper peer review session, except that students can comment in the paper, either using a different text color or, preferably, Word’s comment and/or track changes function(s). Using the latter can preserve peer comments for the duration of the writing process.

Fast Write

At the beginning of class, faculty may have students open Word and write about the assigned topic for a few minutes, then conduct the class as planned, leaving time for students to come back to their initial fast write. This is great for reflection on the day’s topic or simply for critical reading. Varieties of a fast write can be used throughout a class meeting in conjunction with reflection and reading.

Note Taking

A variety of exercises can be done with note taking on the computer. One could project a very short reading (a paragraph or so) and have students take notes, then play musical computers and have peers attempt to reconstruct the original reading from student notes, asking questions of the original writer in the text. Or the instructor can have students take notes on a reading, and then have students contribute their ideas to a discussion, with the instructor typing the suggestions so that the class can see how ideas are generated.

These are just a few of the ways that Word can be used in a computer classroom. When coupled with classroom management software, the uses of Word are greatly expanded, enabling the instructor to project individual student workstations for class feedback.

The instructor needs to be active as students participate in any writing activity, especially in a computer classroom. Although the computer is excellent for writing and reading instruction, it also presents a distraction, with programs like Web browsers and IM services calling out to students who should be engaged in the day’s activity. By moving about the room, the instructor can see what students are doing, and offer feedback at a glance. When conducting workshops for a major assignment, having students write on the computer enables the instructor to provide feedback without having to decipher handwriting, greatly enhancing the experience for the student and permitting the instructor to provide feedback on more students’ work.

            10.2.3 Using PowerPoint to Support a Classroom Lecture

Microsoft PowerPoint software allows faculty and students to construct and deliver information in a "presentational" style, with text, images and multimedia displayed in unified and apportioned "chunks" or units through separated slides.  These presentations have an electronic permanency, unlike an oral lecture supplemented with a chalkboard or a whiteboard.  As such, it may be shared with the intended audience later and also revised and edited with each new usage by the presenter.

Use PowerPoint presentations to:

Outline and enhance, not replace, the talk/lecture/discussion

Display diagrams, pictures, images, videos and sounds that add to the   lesson
When the faculty member is lecturing, the speaker remains the primary source of information, not the slides.  The speaker's oral presentation should remain the centerpiece of the lesson, not the slideshow.  When constructing a PowerPoint presentation: 

Only use 3-5 bullets or information points per slide.

Do not use inappropriate slide animations and sounds, as they could distract from the message

Use light backgrounds and dark text and make text font sizes large enough to read from the back of the room

Make sure the set of slides use a consistent overall design and font and point size
In creating and structuring the message, a PowerPoint is much like any learning activity.  Use learning theory in creating the PowerPoint lessons:

Begin with an attention-getting device

Inform learners/audiences of the objectives and learning goals

Present the information with PowerPoint's strengths in mind (text PLUS multimedia)

Provide learning guidance to reach objectives and goals

Elicit performance and check for ongoing learning (audience interaction)

Ask for feedback and provide reinforcement

Enhance retention and information/knowledge transfer

Move around the room only returning to the computer when it’s time to change slides or bring up a new bulleted item
Do not read slides to the audience.  Keep lights on during the slide show and make the presentation interactive, where students/audience must respond to something on the screen every few slides (a question, a quiz, a discussion point, an addition to information, a summary of what has been said/displayed, etc.).

Power Point Finishing Touches

After creating the PowerPoint, prepare for a quality presentation by practicing orally ahead of time and by checking out the slideshow in the actual environment (classroom and computer) where the presentation will be delivered.  Make sure all components of the equipment function (computer, projector, speakers, etc.).  Always be prepared with a Plan B in case the presentation does not function.  Printed handouts are a good backup and act as a supplement for the audience to take away. 

10.2.4 Computer Classroom Preparation

Teaching in a computer classroom is very different from teaching in a traditional or tech classroom. Much of the difference relates to course preparation. In essence, a course taught in a computer classroom is a different course from one taught in another environment. Below are some recommendations, with some explanation, for adapting/designing a course for a computer classroom.

General Course Design/Adaptations

                   Course Philosophy

The philosophy of a course taught in a computer classroom should be different from the philosophy of a course taught in a traditional setting. While most writing instructors do a good bit of workshop in a traditional classroom, workshopping is enhanced greatly in the computer classroom. Many instructors who teach in computer classrooms teach freshman writing as writing workshops, with students writing for a good bit of time each class meeting. Daily writing can be as simple as 1-5 minute fast writes at the beginning or end of class to devoting the entire period to student work, with the instructor conducting conferences at the computer. Regardless of how a faculty member chooses to utilize the resources in such a room, it is important to plan class meetings carefully in order to make good use of the technology.

One major change in philosophy is the difference between computer-as-tool (i.e. a large typewriter that can play music) and computer-as-workspace. The computer has become a workspace (just look at the typical workplace cubicle, which centers on the monitor/keyboard setup). Teaching in a computer classroom emphasizes the computer as workspace, making it the center of a student’s workstation.

Collaboration

Because students can see their work in print as they type, collaboration—be it group essays or just peer review—is enhanced by the computer environment. Eliminating the handwritten stage enables collaborative activities to proceed more rapidly and in greater depth.

Assignments

Assignments can be identical to a traditional course; however, because students have the potential to work in class, instructors can devote a number of class meetings to working on assignments in class, where instructors and peers can give feedback as the students work.

Conferencing

Because of the computer classroom’s facilitation of workshops, instructors can hold in-class conferences while the whole class engages in a workshop. This permits instructors to conference for each paper and to see changes that students make immediately, enhancing the conferencing session.

Movement

Movement is fundamental in a computer classroom. While it is beneficial (many would say essential) in the traditional classroom, the computer classroom presents a unique situation: the potential for hardware to interfere with instructor-student interaction. Depending on the classroom layout, the monitor can impede a student’s view of the instructor. The monitor can provide a hiding place, as well. Constant movement around the classroom will enable faculty to make eye contact and to interact more effectively with the students.

Extra-Curriculars

One of the challenges in a computer classroom is what we call extra-curriculars. The computer provides a wonderful source of temptation—instant messenger programs, Web browsing, email, and games are all a couple of clicks away. Part of a faculty member’s course preparation should be devoted to how she or he plans to deal with such distractions and temptations. The CWRR Program encourages faculty to have a syllabus policy about extra-curriculars and to consider how to implement it.

Projection

Computer classrooms are typically equipped with an instructor machine hooked to a projector, similar to a technology classroom. Using the projector in conjunction with the computers in the classroom is an incredibly effective use of class time. Part of the faculty member’s preparation should be, then, to figure out what to project. If faculty members have handouts, they might project these as they go over them. If they have electronic readings, they might project these. If students are working, a faculty member might project what one or two students are working on. Additionally, the projection system permits an instructor to prepare comments and handouts in advance. For a completely online course, this is essential, since all r discussion is in text form. However, for a computer classroom, this is important as well. The more one prepares, the more smoothly the class will go.

This final idea is perhaps the most powerful of the list. If a classroom is equipped with computer classroom management software (this is software that enables one to see all of the students’ screens on the instructor screen), one can probably capture a student’s video and project it to the entire class. If the classroom does not have this software, the instructor can have students email their files, which can then be download and projected for all to see. Be sure to allow enough time for this. Although Groupwise isfast on campus, it will still take a few moments to open the email, download the file, and open it.

Sharing a Classroom

In many semesters, CWRR faculty will need to share their classroom with another faculty member. Sharing the classroom means the class may alternately meet in a traditional and tech classroom throughout the semester. If this is the situation, the faculty member needs to prep even more carefully, making sure to reserve activities that would be best handled with students at the computer for the days that class will be held in the computer classroom.

Generally, the following activities are best handled in a computer classroom:

Workshopping

In-class conferencing

Targeted written activities (experimenting with introductory techniques, etc.)

Small group written work
Generally, the following activities are best handled in a technology classroom (note that computer classrooms are also typically tech rooms):

Large group revisions/invention

Presentation of information
Generally, the following activities are best handled in a traditional classroom (with movable seating)

Small group discussion (no computer to get in the way)

Large group discussion (no computer to get in the way)

Activities specific to paper and pencil (clustering, concept maps, etc.)
Of course, all activities can be adapted for a computer classroom. The essential thing to note here, however, is that when one shares a computer classroom, he or she needs to plan activities for the specific type of space.

          Tips

To focus students' attention on a non-computer-related activity in a computer classroom, ask them to turn off their computer monitors. 
Technology components in each technology classroom are different.  Faculty members should familiarize themselves with the technology in the classroom they will be teaching in ahead of time.  Though the faculty member may not use all components of technology in the classroom, students may turn to the faculty member for troubleshooting for their in-class presentations.
With an immediate technology problem that one cannot solve in the classroom, call the Information Technology (IT) Helpdesk at 6488.  Typically, faculty members should attempt to arrive at the classroom each day as early as possible and check to make sure the technology intended for use is working properly.   If the faculty member is unable to use intended technology during the class session due to time limitations, please make sure to report the problem to IT immediately after the class is over. 
10.3 Using Livetext

The Livetext program is currently being used by Millikin as a vehicle for building student portfolios to enhance student learning and to connect student work to the learning goals of the individual departments, the goals of the University and, in some cases, to the goals mandated by the State of Illinois.  Livetext provides a venue for students to examine, evaluate and reflect upon their progress with both the requirements of their chosen disciplines, as well as other essential skill-building (critical thinking, reading, writing and research).  It also provides faculty with the tools for evaluating and responding to student work and the opportunity to connect the student’s work to the larger learning goals of the discipline, the University and the State of Illinois.  As an assessment tool, Livetext can also be used to collect data for the purposes of seeing how a particular course or a series of courses are meeting departmental and University learning goals.

Students coming to Millikin have the opportunity to use Livetext in a variety of ways that will benefit them, not only during their years at Millikin, but also as they look for career opportunities or explore graduate schools as they prepare to leave Millikin.  Livetext offers a virtually unlimited amount of memory so that students can store and revisit materials during their entire scholastic career.  Once a student has signed into the program, it is available to them for the next five years.  While Livetext can be used for peer reviewing and instructor review and evaluation, the student maintains control over the portfolio, including who may visit and view specific work, thus maintaining their control over their own work and keeping each portfolio confidential.  As a result of the large storage capacity, students can download public presentations, musical performances, auditions and so forth which may later be shared with prospective graduate schools or employers.  Livetext, therefore, serves not only as a learning tool for students and a pedagogical tool for instructor evaluation, but also as a repository that allows the student to collect their work, evaluate it for particular audiences and reflect on what has been learned.

Faculty have the opportunity to develop individual portfolios as well.  Both scholarly research and creative writing can be stored in Livetext and shared with others who are, for example, evaluating conference presentations or evaluating a specific piece for publication. 

Detailed instructions for Livetext will be available in the electronic version of this handbook.

10.4 Using Turnitin

Millikin has subscribed to Turnitin.com, an electronic plagiarism prevention and detection service. The service receives electronic versions of papers and checks them against its own database of submitted papers, an archive of the Web and full-text databases. It then returns an originality report to the instructor for review. It stores all submissions in its database, but it will not release those essays without the consent of the instructor.

The best way to use Turnitin is, in conjunction with some of the guidelines on preventing plagiarism presented in this handbook, for prevention. Instructors can submit papers, but the service is far more effective for prevention if students submit essays themselves. They then know that the instructor is using a service to check the integrity of their work, and they will be far less likely to succumb to temptation. This section offers guidelines for using the service and documenting its use for students.

Syllabus Statement

We urge faculty to be transparent in their use of Turnitin. Students should know that faculty are using it, and they should know how the service works. The first place to start is in the syllabus. First, faculty should have a specific policy about academic integrity. Second, faculty should include a statement about their use of Turnitin. We suggest that faculty use the following example statement:

This course uses an electronic tool to ensure that you are using sources effectively and ethically. The service, Turnitin, checks your essays against its own database of submitted essays, the Web, and an electronic database of articles and books. It does not release essays without the consent of the instructor. More information about Turnitin is available at http://www.turnitin.com. If you have questions about citing sources, see Staley Library's site on documenting sources.

Class Discussion

In addition to a syllabus statement, the CWRR Program recommends that faculty members discuss this service as part of their class, probably on the first day when they cover the syllabus and course requirements.  But faculty should also revisit it when they cover topics like documenting sources, paraphrasing, and quoting. If faculty members have access to a technology classroom, they might have the site displayed on the screen for easy reference and to explain exactly how the service works. CWRR faculty having used Turnitin have found that students respond to both written and oral presentations better than they do to only one or the other.

Having Students Submit Papers

The CWRR Program strongly recommends that faculty have students submit their own papers to the service. This serves two purposes. First, students will be actively aware that the integrity of their work is being evaluated, acting as a deterrent to dishonest behavior. Second, it saves the instructor work. Turnitin accepts Word, RTF, WordPerfect, HTLM, PDF, Postscript, and plain text documents. For students not using Word or WordPerfect, documents should be saved in RTF (Rich Text Format). If the faculty member decides to have students submit their own papers, she or he should present the Turnitin Quickstart (http://www.turnitin.com/static/training_support/tii_student_qs.pdf) for students, and go through the process in class.

Instructors can establish parameters for paper submission. One of the nice things about this service is that the instructor can specify a date and time, after which the service will either not accept submissions or tag them as having been submitted late. Once papers have been submitted, Turnitin will generate an originality report within a few minutes.

Using the Originality Report

When the faculty member is ready to view originality reports, he or she will log into Turnitin, and will see a screen of all courses. He or she should click on the relevant course. The next screen will show all of the assignments for the selected course. To view originality reports, click on “Inbox.” Here, the instructor will see students’ names. Clicking on the color-coded Report bar will open the originality report in a new browser window. The left pane of the report displays the student’s paper, with similarities found online color coded. The right pane shows the links to sources of found text. Clicking on the link in the right pane will take the instructor to the original source. One can use these reports not just to document instances of academic integrity violations but also to teach students about using outside sources in their writing.

There’s a plethora of help available online at Turnitin:

Instructor Quickstart: http://www.turnitin.com/static/pdf/tii_instructor_qs.pdf
Instructor User Manual: http://www.turnitin.com/static/pdf/tii_instructor_guide.pdf
Student Quickstart: http://www.turnitin.com/static/pdf/tii_student_qs.pdf
Student User Manual: http://www.turnitin.com/static/pdf/tii_student_guide.pdf

Turnitin markets itself as a plagiarism prevention/detection tool. However, a more effective use of Turnitin is as a teaching tool, with plagiarism detection as a background task that the service performs (see "Preventing Plagiarism" below). The following are some hints on how to pedagogically incorporate Turnitin.

Quotation Usage

Turnitin will display quoted material as color-coded material that it found online. This is an excellent way to teach ways to incorporate quotations into writing. By simply projecting an originality report (preferably with the student’s permission), the instructor can walk through the paper, having students comment on how the writer uses quotations. The instructor can link to the original source to check for context and to instruct students on providing context as part of their introductions to quotations.  The class can also note how much interpretation the student includes to explain his or her quotations. This is a far more effective way to teaching quoting than presenting information and/or providing artificial examples.

Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing is, arguably, the most difficult concept for beginning writers to master. How much does a student need to change to make it his or her own words? Turnitin does not search for exact word matches only. It searches for pattern matches. One effective way to use Turnitin, then, is to display a Web page (preferably an older one), have students paraphrase a paragraph from the source, and then have them submit their paraphrase to Turnitin. The originality report should be generated within minutes. The class can then go through the originality reports to see how much of the paraphrase was linked to information found online.

10.5 Preventing Plagiarism

Academic integrity is a major issue in higher education. In the CWRR Program, as well as at Millikin in general, faculty are more likely to be confronted with plagiarism issues than with cheating, although the latter occurs as well. The philosophy of the CWRR Program is that plagiarism will not be tolerated, and the best way to deal with plagiarism is through prevention.  While Turnitin is one tool in this battle, it is not a solution in itself.

Course Design

Preventing academic integrity issues begins with course design. The first step in designing a plagiarism-resistant course is to become familiar with Millikin’s policies on the issue.  The following website contains Millikin’s definition of plagiarism: http://www.millikin.edu/handbook/judicial_system.asp#plagiarism.  (See section 9.2 Resources & Support for the CWRR Program’s procedure for reporting plagiarism.)
Becoming familiar with Millikin’s definition of academic dishonesty and the program’s reporting procedure is a first step.  But the question remains—how does one make the course plagiarism resistant?

First, include a unit, preferably early in the semester, educating students about academic integrity. This should include the relevant University definitions and policies.  More importantly, it should include an ethical discussion of the issue. Why do instructors take plagiarism and cheating so seriously? Why is it important for students to do their own work? The answers to these questions are many, and chances are that students will come up with good answers, forming a class-wide ethical theory about academic integrity.

Second, spend a significant amount of time working on the use of outside sources in student writing. Many instances of plagiarism are of the inadvertent variety, where students do not quote material but cite it, or inadequately paraphrase. This last issue is probably the trickiest. Students often have a difficult time knowing what is an adequate paraphrase and what is plagiarized. Spending class time working on this can really help.

Assignments

Another way to help make a course plagiarism-resistant is through assignments. Consider written work as opportunities for students to show what they have learned and what they can do. This subtle change in language and attitude can establish a culture of opportunity rather than a culture of resistance.

Second, design each opportunity carefully. The following list is common knowledge in the scholarly literature on academic integrity:

Be contentious about open topics. Any open topic will have plenty of papers readily available on the Web. Students tend to need help in focusing their topics, so provide some topics that are more or less unique to the course.

Specify a purpose for the opportunity. Students often complain that course writing assignments are meaningless, and this apathy toward the assignment can tempt students to plagiarize. Provide students with a particular purpose for the assignment.

Specify a non-instructor audience. This goes hand-in-hand with specifying a purpose. If students see their writing for an audience outside of the course, they will be more likely to take an interest in it, and not to be tempted to plagiarize.

Provide details in opportunities. The more detailed the instructions, the more prepared students will be for success. Clearly specify the task, purpose, and writing situation for students. Also, specify the cognitive steps for the completion of the project. Students following these steps will not be able to plagiarize as easily.

Break Large Projects into Graded Steps. Breaking a term paper down into graded steps forces students to start early and work on a project throughout the term. Having small parts of a project due throughout the term also means that a student cannot plagiarize at the last minute. Faculty should ask students to start with a summary of a key source. This will allow the faculty member to determine how much patchwriting occurs (patchwriting is taking a source and changing terms to make it look like one's own work), in order to head off problems early. Proceed to an annotated bibliography, which forces students to read research for the project, defeating the urge to plagiarize. Collect a draft of the project early, and make sure to grade it. Students are less likely to take drafts seriously if the draft does not have a grade associated with it. The draft will also help to deter the urge to plagiarize.

Require copies of sources. When students turn in the final project, require that they turn in the research that they have collected, complete with notes and highlighted passages. Although this is a lot of paperwork, if students know that they need to turn in their research, they will not be able to plagiarize easily. Additionally, students will see the work that they have put into a project, prompting them to take pride in their effort. Some instructors require that students keep a three-ring binder for the research project. This helps to organize research and provides an easy way to turn it in when the project is due.

Provide sources. Some instructors limit students to using only instructor-provided sources. The instructor then knows the sources and can determine easily if other, illegal sources are used.

Rework opportunities each semester. Perhaps one of the reasons that cheating on exams is not deemed a large problem at Millikin is because over 80% of instructors report that they rewrite exams each term. The same tactic can be used for writing/research projects. Reworking writing opportunities each term means that there will be few to no existing papers on the topic.
Policy Issues

Policy issues are last because the theory behind a plagiarism-resistant course is that faculty members will not need to use their policy. However, there’s a reason for using of the term plagiarism-resistant. No course is plagiarism-proof. Millikin’s policy, is rather broad, so the College of Arts & Sciences adopted a common statement on academic integrity, which every instructor of an Arts & Sciences course must have somewhere in his or her syllabus.  The CWRR Program has slightly modified this statement to make it specific to our program.  The following statement must appear on all CWRR syllabi:

Academic Honesty Policy(include these paragraphs in all CWRR syllabi)
All students are expected to uphold professional standards for academic honesty and integrity in their research, writing and related performances. Academic honesty is the standard we expect from all students. Read the Student Handbook for further explanation (available on the Millikin University web site). Staley Library also hosts a web site on Preventing Plagiarism, which includes the complete university policy. It is located at: http://www.millikin.edu/staley/prevent_plagiarism.html. Visit and carefully read the Preventing Plagiarism web site.

If you submit work that is not your own, that is, plagiarized or copied from any source without proper citation, or if you are caught cheating on any assignment, you will fail the assignment and you may fail the course. In addition, the Registrar and the Office of Student Services will be notified so that they can take action according to university policy, which means that you may be dismissed from the academic program and university. If you have difficulty with any assignment in this course, please see me rather than consider academic dishonesty.

Academic Dishonesty will not be tolerated at Millikin University.  The following apply specifically to academic misconduct in this course:

Plagiarism: The appropriation, theft, purchase or obtaining by any means another’s work, and the unacknowledged submission or incorporation of that work as one’s own. Appropriation includes the quoting or paraphrasing of another’s work without giving credit.

Collusion: Prohibited collaboration with another in preparing work.

Fabrication/Falsification: Unauthorized alteration or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. Falsification involves altering information for use in any academic exercise. Fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information for use in any academic exercise.

Multiple Submissions: The submission by the same individual of substantial portions of the same work (including oral reports) for credit more than once in the same or another course without authorization.

Complicity in academic misconduct: Helping another to commit an act of academic misconduct.
Turnitin.com may be useful to students in addressing any plagiarism concerns they may have.  Millikin University students may learn more about how to properly cite sources and maintain the highest degree of academic integrity with the Turnitin online program. All Millikin University faculty may, at their discretion, use Turnitin (see: http://www.turnitin.com/static/index.html) in order to ensure that students are not having/exhibiting problems with plagiarism.

The Student Conference

One of the stipulations in Millikin’s policy is that instructors meet with students suspected of academic integrity violations. Additionally, the CWRR Program asks that all faculty members contact the CWRR Director if they suspect a CWRR student of plagiarism.  After contacting the Director to receive advice and help, and determining the nature of the case, the faculty member may be encouraged to conference with the suspected student.  This is one of the most difficult meetings that an instructor can have with a student, but it is both important and required if the suspected plagiarism is confirmed.  Again, the teaching community has guidelines to offer in conducting the academic integrity conference:

Do the meeting face-to-face; avoid emailing back and forth and phone conversations. You can gather much from non-verbal communication.

Ask the Director or another experienced English Department faculty member to attend the meeting as a witness and/or mediator.

Do not accuse the student. Beginning a meeting with an accusation sets a bad tone for the meeting and can have other unsavory ramifications, even legal.
There are several ways to approach the topic once the student is sitting in the faculty member’s office. The most common approach is to ask pointed questions about the student’s writing:

What does x mean? (where x is a technical term used in the paper)

Did you use x as a source?

Did you see this Web site?

Explain to me the overall thesis of your project and the main points that you use in developing it.
Pointed questions like this will often prompt a student to admit that he or she engaged in academic dishonesty. If the faculty member has the source from which the student plagiarized, he or she can then confront the student with the source. Without accusation, present the source to the student and ask the student to explain the similarity. Sometimes the plagiarism occurred unintentionally, with the student failing to adequately paraphrase or to cite. This is a judgment that the faculty member and Director need to make when they have the conference with the student. If the faculty member and Director determine that the behavior was intentional, then the faculty member needs to present his or her policy to the student and determine what will happen next.

It may not always be possible to meet with the student, particularly in instances of final projects when the faculty member discovers possible academic integrity problems after students have left for the semester.  If such circumstances arise, contact the CWRR Director, Carmella Braniger or the Dean of Teaching and Learning, Randy Brooks.

Hopefully, all the hard work spent designing a course in which plagiarism will be difficult will prevent these conferences from happening. Yet even the most meticulously-designed course has academic integrity problems from time to time. The CWRR Program’s last piece of advice is to talk with the CWRR Director and other colleagues about these issues. CWRR faculty have the full support of the CWRR Program and English Department when it comes to handling plagiarism issues. Open communications with the Director and others in the program ensures such support.

10.6 Using BlackBoard

BlackBoard is an educational software platform that provides a user-friendly environment for allowing enhanced teaching and learning and computer mediated communication.  It is internet-based, which means that any time or place that faculty members have an internet connection, they (and their students) may connect to the online classroom or information repository.

BlackBoard enables faculty and students to communicate and collaborate through threaded discussions, document sharing, online file exchanges, e-mail messaging and even real-time chats. It allows instructors to use the Internet to extend and enhance communication and offers learning activities that normally take place in the regular classroom.

BlackBoard includes many popular course management features such as:

an announcements area

a repository for making class documents accessible (syllabi and handouts)

a discussion board for electronic conversations between students and the instructor

self-grading objective assessments or short answer and essay responses to questions

an online course grade book, accessible 24/7 by each student

an assignment feature for students to submit assignments electronically

file exchange capabilities, so students can share or peer-edit assignments
A BlackBoard "course shell" can be created for each section of any course taught.  Faculty members can request that a BlackBoard section be created for each of their classes, each semester by sending an email to the Educational Technologist, Joe Hardenbrook.  In the email, it is best to state the name of the course (Critical Writing, Reading and Research I) and the course designation number (IN150) within the email.  Be sure to do this early enough to design the BlackBoard course.

Faculty can log in and access their BlackBoard courses at http://blackboard.millikin.edu.  For directions on how each of the features of BlackBoard work, contact Millikin's Educational Technologist and ask if training workshops will be scheduled soon or ask for a one-on-one appointment.  Once logged into Blackboard, faculty can also read the faculty user's manual in the Control Panel for directions on how to use the software. 

At the end of each semester, faculty members should make sure to "turn off" access to their BlackBoard sections, or "recycle" each of their course shells so that students will not remain registered in their sections. In the event that the faculty member intends to teach the course again, simply remove students from the previous term.

 
 
Millikin University - Decatur, IL
 
Millikin University - Decatur, IL
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